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Title: AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. Site Description - The Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest site is located along the Shark River in the western region of Everglades National Park. Also referred to as site SRS6 of the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER program, freshwater in the mangrove riverine floods the forest floor under a meter of water twice per day. Transgressive discharge of freshwater from the Shark river follows annual rainfall distributions between the wet and dry seasons. Hurricane Wilma struck the site in October of 2005 causing significant damage. The tower was offline until the following October in order to continue temporally consistent measurements. In post-hurricane conditions, ecosystem respiration rates and solar irradiance transfer increased. 2007- 2008 measurements indicate that these factors led to an decline in both annual -NEE and daily NEE from pre-hurricane conditions in 2004-2005.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. Everglades National Park
  2. Pennsylvania State University
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; Everglades National Park; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
NSF, National Park Service, NASA
Resource Relation:
Related Information: JG Barr, V Engel, JD Fuentes, JC Zieman, TL O’Halloran, TJ Smith III, GH Anderson (2010). Controls on mangrove forest-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchanges in western Everglades National Park. J. Geophys. Res. 115, G02020.
OSTI Identifier:
1246105

Barr, Jordan G., and Fuentes, Jose. AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246105.
Barr, Jordan G., & Fuentes, Jose. AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246105.
Barr, Jordan G., and Fuentes, Jose. 2016. "AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades". United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246105. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1246105.
@misc{osti_1246105,
title = {AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades},
author = {Barr, Jordan G. and Fuentes, Jose},
abstractNote = {This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. Site Description - The Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest site is located along the Shark River in the western region of Everglades National Park. Also referred to as site SRS6 of the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER program, freshwater in the mangrove riverine floods the forest floor under a meter of water twice per day. Transgressive discharge of freshwater from the Shark river follows annual rainfall distributions between the wet and dry seasons. Hurricane Wilma struck the site in October of 2005 causing significant damage. The tower was offline until the following October in order to continue temporally consistent measurements. In post-hurricane conditions, ecosystem respiration rates and solar irradiance transfer increased. 2007- 2008 measurements indicate that these factors led to an decline in both annual -NEE and daily NEE from pre-hurricane conditions in 2004-2005.},
doi = {10.17190/AMF/1246105},
year = {2016},
month = {1} }
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
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