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Title: AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak)

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Scrub Oak site is located within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on the east coast of central Florida. Situated in a 10 ha scrub oak ecosystem, the surrounding stand was completely burned by a prescribed fire in 1996. The purpose of the burn was to control understory fuel load, which has been a common practice since 1969. Within a few weeks of the 1996 burn, the stand began to naturally regenerate from roots and rhizomes. Most scrub oak stands in the region undergo a 7 to 10 year disturbance cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low amount of annual rainfall. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amount in 2004 was the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Prevaling wind directions for the site are as follows: W to NW in the winter, afternoon E seamore » breeze in the summer. « less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
  2. University of Central Florida
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
Related Identifiers:
OSTI Identifier:
1246070

Drake, Bert, and Hinkle, Ross. AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246070.
Drake, Bert, & Hinkle, Ross. AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246070.
Drake, Bert, and Hinkle, Ross. 2016. "AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak)". United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1246070. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1246070.
@misc{osti_1246070,
title = {AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak)},
author = {Drake, Bert and Hinkle, Ross},
abstractNote = {This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Scrub Oak site is located within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on the east coast of central Florida. Situated in a 10 ha scrub oak ecosystem, the surrounding stand was completely burned by a prescribed fire in 1996. The purpose of the burn was to control understory fuel load, which has been a common practice since 1969. Within a few weeks of the 1996 burn, the stand began to naturally regenerate from roots and rhizomes. Most scrub oak stands in the region undergo a 7 to 10 year disturbance cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low amount of annual rainfall. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amount in 2004 was the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Prevaling wind directions for the site are as follows: W to NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer.},
doi = {10.17190/AMF/1246070},
year = {2016},
month = {1} }
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
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