skip to main content

Title: AmeriFlux US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine)

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Slash Pine Flatwoods site is located in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on the east coast of central Florida. Occupying 310 ha of local forest, the slash pine flatwoods ecosystem is managed as an uneven-aged stand with a sparsely populated overstory and a dense oak-dominated understory. Disturbances tend to occur on a 7 to 10 year cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. Prescribed fires have been conducted since 1969 to control understory fuel. The most recent burn was conducted in February of 1995. Following the burn, the stand was allowed to naturally regenerate into a open canopy of slash pines, less than 15% of canopy coverage ( on the order of 15-30 trees per ha), with a understory mostly composed of saw palmetto and scrub oak. There was a seasonally wet swale to the southeast that was on the margin of the flux tower footprint. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four yearsmore » of relatively low annual precipitation totals. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amounts in 2004 were the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Wind directions for the site are as follows: W and NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer. « less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
  2. University of Central Florida
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1246069
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
No associated Collections found.
  1. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Scrub Oak site is located within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) onmore » the east coast of central Florida. Situated in a 10 ha scrub oak ecosystem, the surrounding stand was completely burned by a prescribed fire in 1996. The purpose of the burn was to control understory fuel load, which has been a common practice since 1969. Within a few weeks of the 1996 burn, the stand began to naturally regenerate from roots and rhizomes. Most scrub oak stands in the region undergo a 7 to 10 year disturbance cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low amount of annual rainfall. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amount in 2004 was the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Prevaling wind directions for the site are as follows: W to NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer. « less
  2. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-SF2 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1989.. Site Description - Amiro_et_al_2006, AFM/136:...The 1989 burn site (F89) was northeast of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, with the humancaused fire covering 13,500more » ha. Parts of the area had been logged prior to the fire, and slash residues would have been burned in some locations. Parts of the area were aerially seeded with jack pine seeds in the winter of 1990. The present tree canopy was composed of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.), jack pine, trembling aspen, and birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) and prior to the fire, the stand consisted of these same species aswell asblack spruce.Deadsnags of black spruce and jack pinewere still standing, althoughmost had fallen over and formed a leaningmix of dry, dead tree boles. The understory vegetation consisted mostly of black spruce saplings, saplings of the tree overstory species, bearberry, blueberry (Vaccinium myrtilloides Michx.), raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.), rose (Rosa acicularis Lindl.), bunchberry (Cornus canadensis L.), and reed grass (Calamagrostis canadensis (Michx.) Nutt.). « less
  3. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Dk3 Duke Forest - loblolly pine. Site Description - The site was established in 1983 following a clear cut and a burn. Pinus taeda L. (loblolly pine) seedlings were planted at 2.4mmore » by 2.4m spacing and ecosystem development has not been managed after planting. Canopy height increased from 16m in 2001 to 18m in 2004. The canopy is comprised primarily of P. taeda with some emergent Liquidambar styraciflua L. and a diverse and growing understory with 26 different woody species of diameter breast height 42.5 cm. The flux tower lies upwind of the CO2-enriched components of the free atmosphere carbon enrichment (FACE) facility located in the same pine forest. EC instrumentation is at 20.2m on a 22m tower. « less
  4. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest. Site Description - The Bartlett Experimental Forest (448170 N, 71830 W) is located within the White Mountains National Forest in north-central New Hampshire, USA. The 1050 ha forestmore » extends across an elevational range from 200 to 900 m a.s.l. It was established in 1931 and is managed by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station in Durham, NH. The climate is humid continental with short, cool summers (mean July temperature, 19.8C) and long, cold winters (mean January temperature, 9.8C). Annual precipitation averages 130 cm and is distributed evenly throughout the year. Soils are developed from glacial till and are predominantly shallow, well-drained spodosols. At lowto mid-elevation, vegetation is dominated by northern hardwoods (American beech, Fagus grandifolia; sugar maple, Acer saccharum; yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis; with some red maple, Acer rubrum and paper birch, Betula papyrifera). Conifers (eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis; eastern white pine, Pinus strobus; red spruce, Picea rubens) are occasionally found intermixed with the more abundant deciduous species but are generally confined to the highest (red spruce) and lowest (hemlock and pine) elevations. In 2003, the site was adopted as a NASA North American Carbon Program (NACP) Tier-2 field research and validation site. A 26.5 m high tower was installed in a low-elevation northern hardwood stand in November, 2003, for the purpose of making eddy covariance measurements of the forest–atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O and radiant energy. Continuous flux and meteorological measurements began in January, 2004, and are ongoing. Average canopy height in the vicinity of the tower is approximately 20–22 m. In the tower footprint, the forest is predominantly classified into red maple, sugar maple, and American beech forest types. Leaf area index in the vicinity of the tower is 3.6 as measured by seasonal litterfall collection, and 4.5 as measured by the optically based Li-Cor LAI-2000 instrument. Further site information: http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/durham/4155/bartlett.htm « less
  5. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Me2 Metolius-intermediate aged ponderosa pine. Site Description - The mean stand age is 64 years old and the stand age of the oldest trees is about 100 years old. This site ismore » one of the Metolius cluster sites with different age and disturbance classes and part of the AmeriFlux network (http://ameriflux.ornl.gov/fullsiteinfo.php?sid=88). The overstory is almost exclusively composed of ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa Doug. Ex P. Laws) with a few scattered incense cedars (Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin) and has a peak leaf area index (LAI) of 2.8 m2 m-2. Tree height is relatively homogeneous at about 16 m, and the mean tree density is approximately 325 trees ha-1 (Irvine et al., 2008). The understory is sparse with an LAI of 0.2 m2 m-2 and primarily composed of bitterbrush (Purshia tridentate (Push) DC.) and Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula Greene). Soils at the site are sandy (69%/24%/7% sand/silt/clay at 0–0.2 m depth and 66%/27%/7% at 0.2–0.5 m depth, and 54%/ 35%/11% at 0.5–1.0 m depth), freely draining with a soil depth of approximately 1.5 m (Irvine et al., 2008; Law et al., 2001b; Schwarz et al., 2004). « less