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Title: AmeriFlux US-Ton Tonzi Ranch

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ton Tonzi Ranch. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Tonzi Ranch site is classified as an oak savanna woodland on privately owned land. Managed by local rancher, Russell Tonzi, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. The overstory is dominated by blue oak trees (40% of total vegetation) with intermittent grey pine trees (3 trees/ha). Understory species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. These two distinctive layers operate in and out from one another. Growing season of the understory is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May. In contrast, the deciduous blue oak trees are dormant during the rainy winter months and reach maximum LAI in April. The blue oak ecosystem rings the Great Central Valley of California, inhabiting the lower reaches of the Sierra Nevada foothills.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of California, Berkeley
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
DOE/TCP
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Baldocchi, D. D., L. Xu, and N. Kiang (2004), How plant functional-type, weather, seasonal drought, and soil physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak-grass savanna and an annual grassland, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 123(1-2), 13-39. Baldocchi, D., Q. Chen, X. Chen, S. Ma, G. Miller, Y. Ryu, J. Xiao, R. Wenk, and J. Battles (2010), The Dynamics of Energy, Water and Carbon Fluxes in a Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii) Savanna in California, USA, in Ecosystem Function in Global Savannas: Measurement and Modeling at Landscape to Global Scales, edited by M. J. H. a. N. P. Hanan, CRC/Taylor and Francis. Ma, S., Baldocchi, D.D., Xu, L., & Hehn, T. (2007). Inter-annual variability in carbon dioxide exchange of an oak/grass savanna and open grassland in California. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 147, 157-171 Ma, S., Baldocchi, D.D., Xu, L., & Hehn, T. (2007). Inter-annual variability in carbon dioxide exchange of an oak/grass savanna and open grassland in California. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 147, 157-171
OSTI Identifier:
1245971
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
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