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Title: SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
556
DOE Contract Number:
GO00841
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources
Collaborations:
New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-2C)
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geothermal; formation tops; oil wells; southwestern New mexico; southwestern New Mexico
OSTI Identifier:
1223850
  1. The Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) is the submission point for all data collected from researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE GTO). The DOE GTO is providing access to its geothermal project information through the GDR. The GDR is powered by OpenEI, an energy information portal sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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  1. This submission includes three files from two sources. One file is derived from USGS data and includes a series of manipulations to evaluate only shallow wells with high estimated geothermal gradients. Two other files are springs and wells with discharge temperatures above 30°C from themore » NMBGMR Aquifer Mapping database « less
  2. This file contains a compilation of BHT data from oil wells in southwestern New Mexico. Surface temperature is calculated using the collar elevation. An estimate of geothermal gradient is calculated using the estimated surface temperature and the uncorrected BHT data.
  3. Compilation of boron, lithium, bromine, and silica data from wells and springs throughout New Mexico from a wide variety of sources. The chalcedony geothermometry calculation is included in this file.
  4. AASG Wells Data for the EGS Test Site Planning and Analysis Task Temperature measurement data obtained from boreholes for the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) geothermal data project. Typically bottomhole temperatures are recorded from log headers, and this information is provided through a boreholemore » temperature observation service for each state. Service includes header records, well logs, temperature measurements, and other information for each borehole. Information presented in Geothermal Prospector was derived from data aggregated from the borehole temperature observations for all states. For each observation, the given well location was recorded and the best available well identified (name), temperature and depth were chosen. The “Well Name Source,” “Temp. Type” and “Depth Type” attributes indicate the field used from the original service. This data was then cleaned and converted to consistent units. The accuracy of the observation’s location, name, temperature or depth was note assessed beyond that originally provided by the service. - AASG bottom hole temperature datasets were downloaded from repository.usgin.org between the dates of May 16th and May 24th, 2013. - Datasets were cleaned to remove “null” and non-real entries, and data converted into consistent units across all datasets - Methodology for selecting ”best” temperature and depth attributes from column headers in AASG BHT Data sets: • Temperature: • CorrectedTemperature – best • MeasuredTemperature – next best • Depth: • DepthOfMeasurement – best • TrueVerticalDepth – next best • DrillerTotalDepth – last option • Well Name/Identifier • APINo – best • WellName – next best • ObservationURI - last option. The column headers are as follows: • gid = internal unique ID • src_state = the state from which the well was downloaded (note: the low temperature wells in Idaho are coded as “ID_LowTemp”, while all other wells are simply the two character state abbreviation) • source_url = the url for the source WFS service or Excel file • temp_c = “best” temperature in Celsius • temp_type = indicates whether temp_c comes from the corrected or measured temperature header column in the source document • depth_m = “best” depth in meters • depth_type = indicates whether depth_m comes from the measured, true vertical, or driller total depth header column in the source document • well_name = “best” well name or ID • name_src = indicates whether well_name came from apino, wellname, or observationuri header column in the source document • lat_wgs84 = latitude in wgs84 • lon_wgs84 = longitude in wgs84 • state = state in which the point is located • county = county in which the point is located « less
  5. Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) providesmore » an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal . « less