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Title: Phase-retrieval X-ray microscopy by Wigner-distribution deconvolution (CXIDB ID 24)

64x64 scan of a group of latex spheres with 45 nm step size, used for demonstrating Wigner-distribution deconvolution.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
CXIDB ID 24
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); SUNY at Stony Brook
Sponsoring Org:
SUNY at Stony Brook
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Phase-retrieval X-ray microscopy by Wigner-distribution deconvolution, Henry N. Chapman Ultramicroscopy, 1996, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3991(96)00084-8
Subject:
NSLS; XFEL; X1A; X-ray Free-electorn Lasers; Spherical latex particles; Wigner-distribution deconvolution
OSTI Identifier:
1169544
  1. The Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) is a new database which offers scientists from all over the world a unique opportunity to access data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments. The main goal of the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank is to create an open repository for CXI experimental data. CXIDB is dedicated to further the goal of making data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments available to all, as well as archiving it. The website also serves as the reference for the CXI file format, in which most of the experimental data on the database is stored in.
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  1. The basic data provided in these data files are derived from time series of Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/emis/overview_2013.html), the references therein, and the methodology described in Andres et al. (2011). The data accessible here take these tabular, national, mass-emissions data, multiplymore » them by stable carbon isotopic signature (del 13C) as described in Andres et al. (2000), and distribute them spatially on a one degree latitude by one degree longitude grid. The within-country spatial distribution is achieved through a fixed population distribution as reported in Andres et al. (1996) for years prior to 1990 and a variable population distribution for later years (Andres et al. 2016). Note that the mass-emissions data used here are based on fossil-fuel consumption estimates as these are more representative of within country emissions than fossil-fuel production estimates (see http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/faq.html#Q10 for a description why emission totals based upon consumption differ from those based upon production). The monthly, isotopic (δ 13C) fossil-fuel CO2 emissions estimates from 1950-2013 provided in this database are derived from time series of global, regional, and national fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (Boden et al. 2016), the references therein, and the methodology described in Andres et al. (2011). The data accessible here take these tabular, national, mass-emissions data, multiply them by stable carbon isotopic signatures (δ 13C) as described in Andres et al. (2000), and distribute them spatially on a one degree latitude by one degree longitude grid. The within-country spatial distribution is achieved through a fixed population distribution as reported in Andres et al. (1996). Note that the mass-emissions data used here are based on fossil-fuel consumption estimates as these are more representative of within country emissions than fossil-fuel production estimates (see http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/faq.html#Q10 for a description why emission totals based upon consumption differ from those based upon production). « less
  2. At the power levels required for significant heating and current drive in magnetically-confined toroidal plasma, modification of the particle distribution function from a Maxwellian shape is likely [T. H. Stix, Nucl. Fusion, 15 737 (1975)], with consequent changes in wave propagation and in the locationmore » and amount of absorption. In order to study these effects computationally, both the finite-Larmor-radius and the high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW), versions of the full-wave, hot-plasma toroidal simulation code TORIC [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, 1 (1999) and M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 2423 (2002)], have been extended to allow the prescription of arbitrary velocity distributions of the form f(v||, v_perp, psi , theta). For hydrogen (H) minority heating of a deuterium (D) plasma with anisotropic Maxwellian H distributions, the fractional H absorption varies significantly with changes in parallel temperature but is essentially independent of perpendicular temperature. On the other hand, for HHFW regime with anisotropic Maxwellian fast ion distribution, the fractional beam ion absorption varies mainly with changes in the perpendicular temperature. The evaluation of the wave-field and power absorption, through the full wave solver, with the ion distribution function provided by either aMonte-Carlo particle and Fokker-Planck codes is also examined for Alcator C-Mod and NSTX plasmas. Non-Maxwellian effects generally tends to increase the absorption with respect to the equivalent Maxwellian distribution. « less
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  5. The SP2 provides information on the amounts of rBC (refractory black carbon) and of other, non-refractory substances associated with individual rBC containing particles by simultaneously measuring the scattering and incandescence signals of such particles that are directed through the cavity of a 1064 nm Nd:YAGmore » laser. (refractory Black Carbon) rBC mixing ratio (ng/Kg) and number size distribution time series collected during the DOE-ARM sponsored ACME-V field campaign held from June 1 to September 15, 2015 rBC mixing ratio is reported at STP conditions Time resolution: 10 sec Uncertainty: ~ 30% SP2 Unit: 25 Location: Deadhorse, AK Location: N 70-degree 11' 41'' - W 148-degress. 27' 55'' SP2_dateTime: UTC rBC concentration is in units of ng/Kg - dry air. Mass Equivalent Diameters [MED] used for size distribution (SP2_min; SP2_geo; and SP2_max) are in units of micrometers dN/dlogDp counts for a given size bin (SP2_geo) listed as 'SP2_cnts_0 - SP2_cnts_199' and are in units of #/cc. Column naming convention: 'SP2_cnts_X' are the number of particles in bin number _X. , where _X is the row number within the 'SP2_geo' size bin column that contains the mass equivalent diameter (e.g., SP2_cnts_0 = 0.01 microns; SP2_cnts_10 = 0.060 microns, etc.). The dN/dlogDp data is time-resolved where a given row is associated with the timestamp for that row. Note that the rBC column length is one field shorter than the SP2_datetime column. Last time field is not relevant to the rBC time series (see comment below on length of SP2_datetime column) Lengths for SP2_max; SP2_min; SP2_geo are one field longer then the number of SP2_cnts_XX columns . This is to provide bounds for image plots (if desired). Length for SP2_datetime is one field longer than that length of the SP2_cnts_XX columns This is to provide bounds for image plots (if desired) SP2 Calibration: Fullerene soot with corrrection applied for particle density as a function of particle size. No correction for OC content in Fullerene (recent study on SP2 sensitivity to differing black carbon types reports that non-refractory material content for fullerene soot is about 20%). « less