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Title: Serial Femtosecond Crystallography of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (CXIDB ID 21)

Serial femtosecond crystallography data on microcrystals of 5-HT2B receptor bound to ergotamine grown in lipidic cubic phase.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
CXIDB ID 21
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); The Scripps Research Institute, DESY, Arizona State University, Trinity College, SLAC, Uppsala University, University of Hamburg
Sponsoring Org:
The Scripps Research Institute, DESY, Arizona State University, Trinity College, SLAC, Uppsala University, University of Hamburg
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Serial Femtosecond Crystallography of G Protein-Coupled Receptors, Liu et al. Science, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1244142
Subject:
Serotonin 5-HT2B receptor bound to ergotamine; XFEL; X-ray Free-electorn Lasers; Serial Femtosecond Crystallography; CXI; LCLS
OSTI Identifier:
1169541
  1. The Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) is a new database which offers scientists from all over the world a unique opportunity to access data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments. The main goal of the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank is to create an open repository for CXI experimental data. CXIDB is dedicated to further the goal of making data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments available to all, as well as archiving it. The website also serves as the reference for the CXI file format, in which most of the experimental data on the database is stored in.
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  2. Serial femtosecond crystallography data on microcrystals of 5-HT2B receptor bound to ergotamine grown in lipidic cubic phase.
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