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Title: Datasets from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center's Subtropical Woodland Elevated CO2 Experiments

Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
1
DOE Contract Number:
SC0008260
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1163447
No associated Projects found.
No associated Collections found.
  1. This is the FLUXNET2015 version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine).
  2. This is the FLUXNET2015 version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak).
  3. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Slash Pine Flatwoods site is located in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)more » on the east coast of central Florida. Occupying 310 ha of local forest, the slash pine flatwoods ecosystem is managed as an uneven-aged stand with a sparsely populated overstory and a dense oak-dominated understory. Disturbances tend to occur on a 7 to 10 year cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. Prescribed fires have been conducted since 1969 to control understory fuel. The most recent burn was conducted in February of 1995. Following the burn, the stand was allowed to naturally regenerate into a open canopy of slash pines, less than 15% of canopy coverage ( on the order of 15-30 trees per ha), with a understory mostly composed of saw palmetto and scrub oak. There was a seasonally wet swale to the southeast that was on the margin of the flux tower footprint. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low annual precipitation totals. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amounts in 2004 were the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Wind directions for the site are as follows: W and NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer. « less
  4. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Scrub Oak site is located within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) onmore » the east coast of central Florida. Situated in a 10 ha scrub oak ecosystem, the surrounding stand was completely burned by a prescribed fire in 1996. The purpose of the burn was to control understory fuel load, which has been a common practice since 1969. Within a few weeks of the 1996 burn, the stand began to naturally regenerate from roots and rhizomes. Most scrub oak stands in the region undergo a 7 to 10 year disturbance cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low amount of annual rainfall. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amount in 2004 was the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Prevaling wind directions for the site are as follows: W to NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer. « less
  5. This NDP represents the first CDIAC data package to result from our involvement with Soviet scientists as part of Working Group (WG) VIII of the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Joint Committee on Cooperation in the Field of Environmental Protection. The U.S.-U.S.S.R. Agreement on Protection of the Environment, establishedmore » in 1972, covers a wide variety of areas, including environmental pollution, the urban environment, nature preserves, arctic and subarctic ecological systems, earthquake prediction, and institutional measures for environmental protection. WG VIII is concerned with the influence of environmental changes on climate. CDIAC's activities have been conducted under the auspices of WG VIII's "Data Exchange Management" project. (The four other WG VIII projects deal with climate change, atmospheric composition, clouds and radiation fluxes, and stratospheric ozone.) In addition to the Main Geophysical Observatory, other Soviet institutions that have been cooperating with CDIAC in the exchange of CO2 and climate-related data include the All-Union Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information (Obninsk) and the State Hydrological Institute (St. Petersburg). « less