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Title: Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10

We have calculated a chlorite dissolution rate equation at far from equilibrium conditions by combining new data (20 experiments at high temperature) with previously published data Smith et al. 2013 and Lowson et al. 2007. All rate data (from the 127 experiments) are tabulated in this data submission. More information on the calculation of the rate data can be found in our FY13 Annual support (Carroll LLNL, 2013) which has been submitted to the GDR. The rate equation fills a data gap in geothemal kinetic data base and can be used directly to estimate the impact of chemical alteration on all geothermal processes. It is especially important for understanding the role of chemical alteration in the weakening for shear zones in EGS systems.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
246
DOE Contract Number:
FY13 AOP 25727
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Collaborations:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geothermal; chlorite dissolution rate law; geochemistry; geothermal kinetic database; chemical alteration; EGS; chlorite dissolution rate
OSTI Identifier:
1148811

Carroll, Susan. Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.15121/1148811.
Carroll, Susan. Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10. United States. doi:10.15121/1148811.
Carroll, Susan. 2013. "Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10". United States. doi:10.15121/1148811. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1148811.
@misc{osti_1148811,
title = {Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10},
author = {Carroll, Susan},
abstractNote = {We have calculated a chlorite dissolution rate equation at far from equilibrium conditions by combining new data (20 experiments at high temperature) with previously published data Smith et al. 2013 and Lowson et al. 2007. All rate data (from the 127 experiments) are tabulated in this data submission. More information on the calculation of the rate data can be found in our FY13 Annual support (Carroll LLNL, 2013) which has been submitted to the GDR. The rate equation fills a data gap in geothemal kinetic data base and can be used directly to estimate the impact of chemical alteration on all geothermal processes. It is especially important for understanding the role of chemical alteration in the weakening for shear zones in EGS systems.},
doi = {10.15121/1148811},
year = {2013},
month = {9} }
  1. The Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) is the submission point for all data collected from researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE GTO). The DOE GTO is providing access to its geothermal project information through the GDR. The GDR is powered by OpenEI, an energy information portal sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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