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Title: Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

This layer contains transmission network of Colorado as released by Xcel Energy.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
301
DOE Contract Number:
EE0002828
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; Flint Geothermal, LLC
Collaborations:
Flint Geothermal, LLC
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-2C)
Geolocation:
POLYGON ((-101.9956625 40.941946633049,-101.9956625 36.897417334911,-109.103715625 36.897417334911,-109.103715625 40.941946633049,-101.9956625 40.941946633049))
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geothermal; Colorado; Transmission; grid; ArcGIS; GIS; shapefile; shape file; geospatial
Related Identifiers:
OSTI Identifier:
1148764
  1. The Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) is the submission point for all data collected from researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE GTO). The DOE GTO is providing access to its geothermal project information through the GDR. The GDR is powered by OpenEI, an energy information portal sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
No associated Collections found.
  1. This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hotmore » springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area. « less
  2. This submission contains raster and vector data for the entire state of Washington, with specific emphasis on the three geothermal play fairway sites: Mount St. Helens seismic zone (MSHSZ), Wind River valley (WRV), and Mount Baker (MB). Data are provided for 3 major geothermal models:more » heat, permeability, and fluid-filled fractures, and an additional infrastructure model. Both of the permeability and fluid-filled-fracture models are produced at 200 m and at 2 km depths; the heat model is only produced at the 200 m depth. Values are provided for both model favorability and model confidence. A combined model at 200m and 2 km depths is provided for favorability, confidence, and exploration risk. Raster data are provided in GeoTiff format and have a statewide coverage. Cell size is 104.355 ft; file type is unsigned 8-bit integer (0-255); 0 represents no favorability or confidence; 255 represents maximum favorability or confidence. The NAD83(HARN)/Washington South (ftUS) projection is used (EPSG:2927). Vector data are provided in shapefile or comma-delimited text file formats. Geographic coordinates, where provided, are in WGS84. A readme file accompanies each folder and provides an overview and description of the enclosed data. The heat model combines 5 intermediate raster layers (which are included in the download package): temperature gradient wells, young volcanic vents, hot springs, young intrusive volcanic rocks, and geothermometry. The permeability model combines 8 intermediate raster layers: density of mapped faults, 2D dilation tendency of mapped faults, 2D slip tendency of mapped faults, seismicity, 3D dilation tendency, 3D slip tendency, 3D maximum coulomb shear stress, and 3D slip gradients. The fluid-filled fracture model combines up to 4 intermediate rasters: resistivity from magneto-telluric 3D inversions, seismicity, Vp/Vs anomalies from passive seismic tomography, and Vs anomalies from ambient-noise tomography. A statewide infrastructure model is also provided that formalizes land-use constraints and restrictions relevant for geothermal prospecting and development. This model combines 10 intermediate rasters: areas off limits to drilling, existing or proposed geothermal leases, DNR-owned land, land-use restrictions along the Columbia River Gorge, areas inundated by water, availability of potential process water, proximity to existing roads, proximity to transmission lines, distance from urban areas, and snow-related elevation restrictions. Supporting vector data for the development of each raster layer is provided. For details on the areas of interest and modeling process please see the 'WA_State_Play_Fairway_Phase_2_Technical_Report' in the download package. « less
  3. These line shapefiles trace apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in various counties in Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids, as part of a DOE reconnaissance geothermal exploration program. Geothermal fluids commonlymore » utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable "plumbing system" that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. This line shapefile is an attempt to use desktop GIS to delineate possible faults and fracture orientations and locations in highly prospective areas prior to an initial site visit. Geochemical sampling and geologic mapping could then be centered around these possible faults and fractures. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and utility right-of-ways. Still, it is unknown what actual features these lineaments, if they exist, represent. Although the shapefiles are arranged by county, not all areas within any county have been examined for lineaments. Work was focused on either satellite thermal infrared anomalies, known hot springs or wells, or other evidence of geothermal systems. Finally, lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Credits: These lineament shapefile was created by Geothermal Development Associates, as part of a geothermal geologic reconnaissance performed by Flint Geothermal, LLC, of Denver Colorado. Use Limitation: These shapefiles were constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and/or nature. « less
  4. The US Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2009) outlined a mean 30GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western US. One goal of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP)more » Blue Ribbon Panel (GTO, 2011) recommended that DOE focus efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont, et al, 1990) will give operators a single point of information to gather clean, unbiased information on which to build geothermal drilling prospects. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) has been working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In fiscal year 2013, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In fiscal year 2014, ten additional case studies were completed, and additional features were added to the template to allow for more data and the direct citations of data. The template allows for: Data - a variety of data can be collected for each area, including power production information, well field information, geologic information, reservoir information, and geochemistry information. Narratives ? general (e.g. area overview, history and infrastructure), technical (e.g. exploration history, well field description, R&D activities) and geologic narratives (e.g. area geology, hydrothermal system, heat source, geochemistry.) Exploration Activity Catalog - catalog of exploration activities conducted in the area (with dates and references.) NEPA Analysis ? a query of NEPA analyses conducted in the area (that have been catalogued in the OpenEI NEPA database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models. « less
  5. This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cyclemore » fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. « less