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Title: GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods
Authors:
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Rdige, TN (US)
Collaborations:
PNL, BNL,ANL,ORNL
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 Environmental Sciences; CCSI; climate datasets; Daily Mean Temperature; Daily Sea Level Air Pressure
OSTI Identifier:
1130373
  1. The Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) was formed in 2009 to integrate climate science activities across Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Approximately, 130 scientists are doing research in the areas of (i) earth system modeling, (ii) data integration, dissemination, and informatics, (iii) integrative ecosystem scienceterrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle science, and (iv) climate impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability science. CCSI works to strengthen the predictive capabilities and effectiveness of climate and biogeochemical models and develop useful climate adaptation and mitigation tools and information in collaboration with land-energy-water system stakeholders.
No associated Collections found.
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