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Title: ARM: Snow depth

Snow depth
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric moisture; Atmospheric pressure; Atmospheric temperature; Horizontal wind; Precipitation; Visibility
OSTI Identifier:
1025283
  1. ARM focuses on obtaining continuous measurements—supplemented by field campaigns—and providing data products that promote the advancement of climate models. ARM data include routine data products, value-added products (VAPs), field campaign data, complementary external data products from collaborating programs, and data contributed by ARM principal investigators for use by the scientific community. Data quality reports, graphical displays of data availability/quality, and data plots are also available from the ARM Data Center. Serving users worldwide, the ARM Data Center collects and archives approximately 20 terabytes of data per month. Datastreams are generally available for download within 48 hours.
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  1. This data package provides daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompassmore » 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893-1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station's daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags. The snow depth data have undergone extensive manual and automated quality assurance checks by NCDC and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). These reviews involved examining the data for completeness, reasonableness, and accuracy, and included comparison of some data records with records in NCDC's Summary of the Day First Order online database. Since the snow depth measurements have been taken at NWS first-order stations that have long periods of record, they should prove useful in monitoring climate change. « less
  2. End-of-winter snow depth and average snow density from area A, B, C and D, which include 1000's of point depth measurement located between approximately 20 and 50 cm apart.
  3. Meteorological data are currently being collected at two locations at the Teller Site, Seward Peninsula. Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussock / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurementsmore » and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products. « less
  4. Meteorological data are currently being collected at one location at the top of the Kougarok hill, Seward Peninsula. This December 18, 2017 release includes data for: Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussockmore » / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products. « less
  5. The Antarctic CH4 records presented here are derived from three ice cores obtained at Law Dome, East Antarctica (66°44'S, 112°50'E, 1390 meters above mean sea level). Law Dome has many qualities of an ideal ice core site for the reconstruction of past concentrations of atmosphericmore » gases; these qualities include: negligible melting of the ice sheet surface, low concentrations of impurities, regular stratigraphic layering undisturbed by wind stress at the surface or differential ice flow at depth, and a high snow accumulation rate. Further details on the site, drilling, and cores are provided by Etheridge et al. (1998), Etheridge et al. (1996), Etheridge and Wookey (1989), and Morgan et al. (1997). The two Greenland ice cores are from the Summit region (72°34' N, 37°37' W, 3200 meters above mean sea level). Lower snow accumulation rate there results in lower air-age resolution, and measurements presented here cover only the pre-industrial period (until 1885). More details about these measurements are presented in Etheridge et al. (1998). Additionally, this site contains firn data from Core DE08-2, and archived air samples from Cape Grim, Tasmania, for comparison. « less