skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Dynamic behavior of boron carbide.

Abstract

Boron carbide displays a rich response to dynamic compression that is not well understood. To address poorly understood aspects of behavior, including dynamic strength and the possibility of phase transformations, a series of plate impact experiments was performed that also included reshock and release configurations. Hugoniot data were obtained from the elastic limit (15-18 GPa) to 70 GPa and were found to agree reasonably well with the somewhat limited data in the literature. Using the Hugoniot data, as well as the reshock and release data, the possibility of the existence of one or more phase transitions was examined. There is tantalizing evidence, but at this time no phase transition can be conclusively demonstrated. However, the experimental data are consistent with a phase transition at a shock stress of about 40 GPa, though the volume change associated with it would have to be small. The reshock and release experiments also provide estimates of the shear stress and strength in the shocked state as well as a dynamic mean stress curve for the material. The material supports only a small shear stress in the shocked (Hugoniot) state, but it can support a much larger shear stress when loaded or unloaded from themore » shocked state. This strength in the shocked state is initially lower than the strength at the elastic limit but increases with pressure to about the same level. Also, the dynamic mean-stress curve estimated from reshock and release differs significantly from the hydrostate constructed from low-pressure data. Finally, a spatially resolved interferometer was used to directly measure spatial variations in particle velocity during the shock event. These spatially resolved measurements are consistent with previous work and suggest a nonuniform failure mode occurring in the material.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
993882
Report Number(s):
SAND2003-2458J
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979; JAPIAU; TRN: US201024%%182
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Proposed for publication in Journal of Applied Physics.
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BORON CARBIDES; COMPRESSION; INTERFEROMETERS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PLATES; SHEAR; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Reinhart, William Dodd, Vogler, Tracy John, and Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra. Dynamic behavior of boron carbide.. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Reinhart, William Dodd, Vogler, Tracy John, & Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra. Dynamic behavior of boron carbide.. United States.
Reinhart, William Dodd, Vogler, Tracy John, and Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra. 2003. "Dynamic behavior of boron carbide.". United States.
@article{osti_993882,
title = {Dynamic behavior of boron carbide.},
author = {Reinhart, William Dodd and Vogler, Tracy John and Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra},
abstractNote = {Boron carbide displays a rich response to dynamic compression that is not well understood. To address poorly understood aspects of behavior, including dynamic strength and the possibility of phase transformations, a series of plate impact experiments was performed that also included reshock and release configurations. Hugoniot data were obtained from the elastic limit (15-18 GPa) to 70 GPa and were found to agree reasonably well with the somewhat limited data in the literature. Using the Hugoniot data, as well as the reshock and release data, the possibility of the existence of one or more phase transitions was examined. There is tantalizing evidence, but at this time no phase transition can be conclusively demonstrated. However, the experimental data are consistent with a phase transition at a shock stress of about 40 GPa, though the volume change associated with it would have to be small. The reshock and release experiments also provide estimates of the shear stress and strength in the shocked state as well as a dynamic mean stress curve for the material. The material supports only a small shear stress in the shocked (Hugoniot) state, but it can support a much larger shear stress when loaded or unloaded from the shocked state. This strength in the shocked state is initially lower than the strength at the elastic limit but increases with pressure to about the same level. Also, the dynamic mean-stress curve estimated from reshock and release differs significantly from the hydrostate constructed from low-pressure data. Finally, a spatially resolved interferometer was used to directly measure spatial variations in particle velocity during the shock event. These spatially resolved measurements are consistent with previous work and suggest a nonuniform failure mode occurring in the material.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/993882}, journal = {Proposed for publication in Journal of Applied Physics.},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 8,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {7}
}