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Title: An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring

Abstract

Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several powerful analytical techniques, well suited for characterizing atmospheric composition. A few applications of infrared spectroscopy include air quality monitoring of building environs, automotive exhaust emissions, “fence-line” or open-path monitoring near industrial facilities and smokestack emissions. Regardless of the application or the specific instrumental configuration (Fourier transform, dispersive, laser based, …) a comprehensive reference library is critical to interpreting spectral data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), through the support of the Department of Energy is developing a comprehensive infrared spectral library tailored for atmospheric environmental monitoring.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
993379
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-48534
17995; NN2001000; TRN: US201023%%312
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SPIE Newsroom, 12 April 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR QUALITY; AVAILABILITY; COMMERCIALIZATION; COMPUTERS; CONFIGURATION; DOCUMENTATION; LASERS; MONITORING; RESOLUTION; SPECTROSCOPY; infrared; spectroscopy; library; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Sharpe, Steven W., Sams, Robert L., and Johnson, Timothy J. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1117/2.1200603.0152.
Sharpe, Steven W., Sams, Robert L., & Johnson, Timothy J. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. United States. doi:10.1117/2.1200603.0152.
Sharpe, Steven W., Sams, Robert L., and Johnson, Timothy J. Wed . "An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring". United States. doi:10.1117/2.1200603.0152.
@article{osti_993379,
title = {An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring},
author = {Sharpe, Steven W. and Sams, Robert L. and Johnson, Timothy J.},
abstractNote = {Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several powerful analytical techniques, well suited for characterizing atmospheric composition. A few applications of infrared spectroscopy include air quality monitoring of building environs, automotive exhaust emissions, “fence-line” or open-path monitoring near industrial facilities and smokestack emissions. Regardless of the application or the specific instrumental configuration (Fourier transform, dispersive, laser based, …) a comprehensive reference library is critical to interpreting spectral data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), through the support of the Department of Energy is developing a comprehensive infrared spectral library tailored for atmospheric environmental monitoring.},
doi = {10.1117/2.1200603.0152},
journal = {SPIE Newsroom, 12 April 2006},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured andmore » preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.« less
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