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Title: Current Status of VHTR Technology Development

Abstract

Abstract – High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) featuring particle fuel reached the stage of commercial deployment in the mid-1980s with the Fort St.Vrain and Thorium HochTemperatur Reaktor feeding electricity to the grids in the United States and West Germany, respectively. The technology was then adopted by Japan and China with the operation of the High Temperature Test Reactor in Oarai, Japan and the High Temperature Reactor (HTR-10) in China. Increasing the outlet temperature of the HTGR to even higher temperatures above 900°C will improve the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and enable application of a new class of gas reactor, the very high temperature reactor, to provide process heat, electricity, and hydrogen to chemical industries with the attendant benefits of improved energy security and reduced CO2 emissions. However, the increase in coolant outlet temperature presents a number of technical challenges associated with fuel, materials, power conversion, and analysis methods for the reactor and hydrogen production. The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a broad program of research and development with a goal of addressing the technical challenges over a broad range of outlet temperatures as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This paper describes the research and developmentmore » activities that are currently underway to realize the technologies needed for an HTGR that features outlet temperatures of 750 to 950°C.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
993176
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-10-18035
TRN: US1007981
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: HTR 2010,Prague,10/18/2010,10/20/2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; COOLANTS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRICITY; FEEDING; HTTR REACTOR; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; PROCESS HEAT; SECURITY; THERMODYNAMICS; THORIUM; NGNP+TDO+FUELS+VHTR+HTGR+Temperature+CO2

Citation Formats

David Petti, Hans Gougar, Richard Wright, William Windes, Steve Herring, Richard Schultz, and Paul Humrickhouse. Current Status of VHTR Technology Development. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
David Petti, Hans Gougar, Richard Wright, William Windes, Steve Herring, Richard Schultz, & Paul Humrickhouse. Current Status of VHTR Technology Development. United States.
David Petti, Hans Gougar, Richard Wright, William Windes, Steve Herring, Richard Schultz, and Paul Humrickhouse. Fri . "Current Status of VHTR Technology Development". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/993176.
@article{osti_993176,
title = {Current Status of VHTR Technology Development},
author = {David Petti and Hans Gougar and Richard Wright and William Windes and Steve Herring and Richard Schultz and Paul Humrickhouse},
abstractNote = {Abstract – High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) featuring particle fuel reached the stage of commercial deployment in the mid-1980s with the Fort St.Vrain and Thorium HochTemperatur Reaktor feeding electricity to the grids in the United States and West Germany, respectively. The technology was then adopted by Japan and China with the operation of the High Temperature Test Reactor in Oarai, Japan and the High Temperature Reactor (HTR-10) in China. Increasing the outlet temperature of the HTGR to even higher temperatures above 900°C will improve the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and enable application of a new class of gas reactor, the very high temperature reactor, to provide process heat, electricity, and hydrogen to chemical industries with the attendant benefits of improved energy security and reduced CO2 emissions. However, the increase in coolant outlet temperature presents a number of technical challenges associated with fuel, materials, power conversion, and analysis methods for the reactor and hydrogen production. The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a broad program of research and development with a goal of addressing the technical challenges over a broad range of outlet temperatures as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This paper describes the research and development activities that are currently underway to realize the technologies needed for an HTGR that features outlet temperatures of 750 to 950°C.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Fri Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}

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