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Title: Generalized Linear Least-Squares Adjustment, Revisited

Abstract

After a short introduction outlining the history and applications of the methodology in reactor physics, a new application of the methodology in criticality safety is discussed. Some characteristic input data are discussed in detail.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
993038
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of ASTM International; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 42 ENGINEERING; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; CRITICALITY; REACTOR PHYSICS; SAFETY ANALYSIS; LEAST SQUARE FIT

Citation Formats

Broadhead, Bryan L, Williams, Mark L, and Wagschal, Jekutiel Jehudah. Generalized Linear Least-Squares Adjustment, Revisited. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1520/JAI13461.
Broadhead, Bryan L, Williams, Mark L, & Wagschal, Jekutiel Jehudah. Generalized Linear Least-Squares Adjustment, Revisited. United States. doi:10.1520/JAI13461.
Broadhead, Bryan L, Williams, Mark L, and Wagschal, Jekutiel Jehudah. Sun . "Generalized Linear Least-Squares Adjustment, Revisited". United States. doi:10.1520/JAI13461.
@article{osti_993038,
title = {Generalized Linear Least-Squares Adjustment, Revisited},
author = {Broadhead, Bryan L and Williams, Mark L and Wagschal, Jekutiel Jehudah},
abstractNote = {After a short introduction outlining the history and applications of the methodology in reactor physics, a new application of the methodology in criticality safety is discussed. Some characteristic input data are discussed in detail.},
doi = {10.1520/JAI13461},
journal = {Journal of ASTM International},
number = 7,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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