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Title: Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

Abstract

Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressuremore » recovery.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
992757
Report Number(s):
LLNL-PROC-424230
TRN: US201022%%545
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 9th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture & Sequestration, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, May 10 - May 13, 2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; AQUIFERS; BRINES; CARBON; DESALINATION; DRINKING WATER; FRESH WATER; INTERSTITIAL WATER; OSMOSIS; PLANNING; SEAWATER; SITE SELECTION; STORAGE; TARGETS; THERMODYNAMICS; WATER; WATER TREATMENT

Citation Formats

Aines, R D, Wolery, T J, Bourcier, W L, Wolfe, T, and Haussmann, C. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Aines, R D, Wolery, T J, Bourcier, W L, Wolfe, T, & Haussmann, C. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage. United States.
Aines, R D, Wolery, T J, Bourcier, W L, Wolfe, T, and Haussmann, C. Fri . "Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/992757.
@article{osti_992757,
title = {Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage},
author = {Aines, R D and Wolery, T J and Bourcier, W L and Wolfe, T and Haussmann, C},
abstractNote = {Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
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