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Title: Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.

Abstract

The performance of a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to 'get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall GMTI radar system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the 'seek time'.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
992323
Report Number(s):
SAND2010-5844
TRN: US201022%%357
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; PERFORMANCE; RADAR; TARGETS; DETECTION; LIMITING VALUES; PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS; MILITARY EQUIPMENT; Radar-Military applications.; Radar targets.

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/992323.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.. United States. doi:10.2172/992323.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Wed . "Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.". United States. doi:10.2172/992323. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/992323.
@article{osti_992323,
title = {Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {The performance of a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to 'get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall GMTI radar system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the 'seek time'.},
doi = {10.2172/992323},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Multi-aperture or multi-subaperture antennas are fundamental to Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar systems in order to detect slow-moving targets with Doppler characteristics similar to clutter. Herein we examine the performance of several subaperture architectures for their clutter cancelling performance. Significantly, more antenna phase centers isn’t always better, and in fact is sometimes worse, for detecting targets.
  • The various embodiments presented herein relate to utilizing an operational single-channel radar to collect and process synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) imagery from a same set of radar returns. In an embodiment, data is collected by randomly staggering a slow-time pulse repetition interval (PRI) over a SAR aperture such that a number of transmitted pulses in the SAR aperture is preserved with respect to standard SAR, but many of the pulses are spaced very closely enabling movers (e.g., targets) to be resolved, wherein a relative velocity of the movers places them outside of the SARmore » ground patch. The various embodiments of image reconstruction can be based on compressed sensing inversion from undersampled data, which can be solved efficiently using such techniques as Bregman iteration. The various embodiments enable high-quality SAR reconstruction, and high-quality GMTI reconstruction from the same set of radar returns.« less
  • Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.
  • Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible usingmore » straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.« less
  • From Tri-service electronic fuse symposium; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (26 Nov 1973). A pulse-Doppler radar fuze for use against ground targets at high burst heights can operate at low peak power provided a high duty ratio is used. The high duty ratio brings about ambiguous ground return that is prevented from firing the fuze by randomly coding the phase of the transmitted pulses. This causes the ambiguous return to appear as random noise. This paper provides formulas for the calculation of the clutter-noise power density and of the signal power so that the performance of the radar can bemore » determined. The paper also discusses the myth of decorrelation'' that is alleged to destroy the transmittedphase modulation in the echo and so make it useless. (auth)« less