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Title: High Frequency Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the 1-8 MHz Regime

Abstract

Imaging mechanisms in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the high frequency regime above the first contact resonance are analyzed. High frequency imaging enables the effective use of resonance enhancement to amplify weak piezoelectric signals, improves the signal to noise ratio, minimizes the electrostatic contribution to the signal, and improves electrical contact. The limiting factors include inertial stiffening and deteriorating signal transduction, laser spot effects, and the photodetector bandwidth. The analytical expressions for these limits are derived. Furthermore, in the resonance regime, contact stiffness depends strongly on the local elastic properties and topography, resulting in significant variations of the resonant frequency and necessitating efficient frequency tracking methods. High-veracity PFM operation in the 1-8 MHz frequency range is demonstrated and future prospects for high frequency PFM in the 10-100 MHz range are discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
992086
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; MICROSCOPES; DESIGN; PIEZOELECTRICITY; PERFORMANCE; ELASTICITY; FLEXIBILITY; MHZ RANGE; MICROSCOPY; RESONANCE; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO

Citation Formats

Seal, Katyayani, Rodriguez, Brian J, Kalinin, Sergei V, Jesse, Stephen, and Baddorf, Arthur P. High Frequency Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the 1-8 MHz Regime. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2814971.
Seal, Katyayani, Rodriguez, Brian J, Kalinin, Sergei V, Jesse, Stephen, & Baddorf, Arthur P. High Frequency Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the 1-8 MHz Regime. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2814971.
Seal, Katyayani, Rodriguez, Brian J, Kalinin, Sergei V, Jesse, Stephen, and Baddorf, Arthur P. Mon . "High Frequency Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the 1-8 MHz Regime". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2814971.
@article{osti_992086,
title = {High Frequency Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the 1-8 MHz Regime},
author = {Seal, Katyayani and Rodriguez, Brian J and Kalinin, Sergei V and Jesse, Stephen and Baddorf, Arthur P},
abstractNote = {Imaging mechanisms in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy in the high frequency regime above the first contact resonance are analyzed. High frequency imaging enables the effective use of resonance enhancement to amplify weak piezoelectric signals, improves the signal to noise ratio, minimizes the electrostatic contribution to the signal, and improves electrical contact. The limiting factors include inertial stiffening and deteriorating signal transduction, laser spot effects, and the photodetector bandwidth. The analytical expressions for these limits are derived. Furthermore, in the resonance regime, contact stiffness depends strongly on the local elastic properties and topography, resulting in significant variations of the resonant frequency and necessitating efficient frequency tracking methods. High-veracity PFM operation in the 1-8 MHz frequency range is demonstrated and future prospects for high frequency PFM in the 10-100 MHz range are discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2814971},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 23,
volume = 91,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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