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Title: Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.

Abstract

A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k{sub eff} andmore » the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron transport and CFD solutions. Previous researchers have successfully performed Monte Carlo calculations with limited thermal feedback. In fact, much of the validation of the deterministic neutronics transport code DeCART in was performed using the Monte Carlo code McCARD which employs a limited thermal feedback model. However, for a broader range of temperature/fluid applications it was desirable to couple Monte Carlo to a more sophisticated temperature fluid solution such as CFD. This paper focuses on the methods used to couple Monte Carlo to CFD and their application to a series of simple test problems.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
991607
Report Number(s):
ANL/NE/CP-58661
TRN: US1007517
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Joint International Topical Meeting on Mathematics & Computations and Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (M&C + SNA 2007); Apr. 15, 2007 - Apr. 19, 2007; Monterey, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; AUDITS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CROSS SECTIONS; FEEDBACK; FLUID MECHANICS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRON TRANSPORT; POWER DENSITY; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES; REACTOR PHYSICS; REACTORS; SIMULATION; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; TESTING; THERMAL HYDRAULICS; TRANSPORT; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Seker, V., Thomas, J. W., Downar, T. J., and Purdue Univ.. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Seker, V., Thomas, J. W., Downar, T. J., & Purdue Univ.. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.. United States.
Seker, V., Thomas, J. W., Downar, T. J., and Purdue Univ.. Mon . "Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_991607,
title = {Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.},
author = {Seker, V. and Thomas, J. W. and Downar, T. J. and Purdue Univ.},
abstractNote = {A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k{sub eff} and the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron transport and CFD solutions. Previous researchers have successfully performed Monte Carlo calculations with limited thermal feedback. In fact, much of the validation of the deterministic neutronics transport code DeCART in was performed using the Monte Carlo code McCARD which employs a limited thermal feedback model. However, for a broader range of temperature/fluid applications it was desirable to couple Monte Carlo to a more sophisticated temperature fluid solution such as CFD. This paper focuses on the methods used to couple Monte Carlo to CFD and their application to a series of simple test problems.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • CCFE perform Monte-Carlo transport simulations on large and complex tokamak models such as ITER. Such simulations are challenging since streaming and deep penetration effects are equally important. In order to make such simulations tractable, both variance reduction (VR) techniques and parallel computing are used. It has been found that the application of VR techniques in such models significantly reduces the efficiency of parallel computation due to 'long histories'. VR in MCNP can be accomplished using energy-dependent weight windows. The weight window represents an 'average behaviour' of particles, and large deviations in the arriving weight of a particle give rise tomore » extreme amounts of splitting being performed and a long history. When running on parallel clusters, a long history can have a detrimental effect on the parallel efficiency - if one process is computing the long history, the other CPUs complete their batch of histories and wait idle. Furthermore some long histories have been found to be effectively intractable. To combat this effect, CCFE has developed an adaptation of MCNP which dynamically adjusts the WW where a large weight deviation is encountered. The method effectively 'de-optimises' the WW, reducing the VR performance but this is offset by a significant increase in parallel efficiency. Testing with a simple geometry has shown the method does not bias the result. This 'long history method' has enabled CCFE to significantly improve the performance of MCNP calculations for ITER on parallel clusters, and will be beneficial for any geometry combining streaming and deep penetration effects. (authors)« less
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