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Title: Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap

Abstract

The objective of this project was to develop advanced metallic catalyst substrate materials and designs for use in off-highway applications. The new materials and designs will be used as catalyst substrates and diesel particulate traps. They will increase durability, reduce flow resistance, decrease time to light-off, and reduce cost relative to cordierite substrates. Metallic catalyst substrates are used extensively for diesel oxidation catalysts and have the potential to be used in other catalytic systems for diesel engines. Metallic substrates have many advantages over ceramic materials including improved durability and resistance to thermal shock and vibration. However, the cost is generally higher than cordierite. The most common foil material used for metallic substrates is FeCr Alloy, which is expensive and has temperature capabilities beyond what is necessary for diesel applications. The first task in the project was Identification and Testing of New Materials. In this task, several materials were analyzed to determine if a low cost substitute for FeCr Alloy was available or could be developed. Two materials were identified as having lower cost while showing no decrease in mechanical properties or oxidation resistance at the application temperatures. Also, the ability to fabricate these materials into a finished substrate was notmore » compromised, and the ability to washcoat these materials was satisfactory. Therefore, both candidate materials were recommended for cost savings depending on which would be less expensive in production quantities. The second task dealt with the use of novel flow designs to improve the converter efficiency while possibly decreasing the size of the converter to reduce cost even more. A non-linear flow path was simulated to determine if there would be an increase in efficiency. From there, small samples were produced for bench testing. Bench tests showed that the use of non-linear channels significantly reduced the light-off temperature for diesel oxidation catalytic converters. Finally, the third task was to implement these materials and designs into a full-size converter. Hot shake testing of 13-inch diameter straight channel substrates showed no significant difference in durability between the current material and the two proposed materials. At the time that this program ended, preparations were being made for full-scale emissions testing of the new design converter for comparison to a traditional straight channel with equal catalyst loading.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Caterpillar Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
991025
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-02AL67974
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; CATALYSTS; CATALYTIC CONVERTERS; CERAMICS; DESIGN; DIESEL ENGINES; EFFICIENCY; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; OXIDATION; PARTICULATES; PRODUCTION; SUBSTRATES; TESTING; THERMAL SHOCK

Citation Formats

Pollard, Michael, Habeger, Craig, Frary, Megan, Haines, Scott, Fluharty, Amy, Dakhoul, Youssef, Carr, Michael, Park, Paul, Stefanick, Matthew, DaCosta, Herbert, Balmer-Millar, M Lou, Readey, Michael, and McCluskey, Philip. Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/991025.
Pollard, Michael, Habeger, Craig, Frary, Megan, Haines, Scott, Fluharty, Amy, Dakhoul, Youssef, Carr, Michael, Park, Paul, Stefanick, Matthew, DaCosta, Herbert, Balmer-Millar, M Lou, Readey, Michael, & McCluskey, Philip. Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap. United States. doi:10.2172/991025.
Pollard, Michael, Habeger, Craig, Frary, Megan, Haines, Scott, Fluharty, Amy, Dakhoul, Youssef, Carr, Michael, Park, Paul, Stefanick, Matthew, DaCosta, Herbert, Balmer-Millar, M Lou, Readey, Michael, and McCluskey, Philip. Sat . "Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap". United States. doi:10.2172/991025. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/991025.
@article{osti_991025,
title = {Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap},
author = {Pollard, Michael and Habeger, Craig and Frary, Megan and Haines, Scott and Fluharty, Amy and Dakhoul, Youssef and Carr, Michael and Park, Paul and Stefanick, Matthew and DaCosta, Herbert and Balmer-Millar, M Lou and Readey, Michael and McCluskey, Philip},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project was to develop advanced metallic catalyst substrate materials and designs for use in off-highway applications. The new materials and designs will be used as catalyst substrates and diesel particulate traps. They will increase durability, reduce flow resistance, decrease time to light-off, and reduce cost relative to cordierite substrates. Metallic catalyst substrates are used extensively for diesel oxidation catalysts and have the potential to be used in other catalytic systems for diesel engines. Metallic substrates have many advantages over ceramic materials including improved durability and resistance to thermal shock and vibration. However, the cost is generally higher than cordierite. The most common foil material used for metallic substrates is FeCr Alloy, which is expensive and has temperature capabilities beyond what is necessary for diesel applications. The first task in the project was Identification and Testing of New Materials. In this task, several materials were analyzed to determine if a low cost substitute for FeCr Alloy was available or could be developed. Two materials were identified as having lower cost while showing no decrease in mechanical properties or oxidation resistance at the application temperatures. Also, the ability to fabricate these materials into a finished substrate was not compromised, and the ability to washcoat these materials was satisfactory. Therefore, both candidate materials were recommended for cost savings depending on which would be less expensive in production quantities. The second task dealt with the use of novel flow designs to improve the converter efficiency while possibly decreasing the size of the converter to reduce cost even more. A non-linear flow path was simulated to determine if there would be an increase in efficiency. From there, small samples were produced for bench testing. Bench tests showed that the use of non-linear channels significantly reduced the light-off temperature for diesel oxidation catalytic converters. Finally, the third task was to implement these materials and designs into a full-size converter. Hot shake testing of 13-inch diameter straight channel substrates showed no significant difference in durability between the current material and the two proposed materials. At the time that this program ended, preparations were being made for full-scale emissions testing of the new design converter for comparison to a traditional straight channel with equal catalyst loading.},
doi = {10.2172/991025},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

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