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Title: Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.

Abstract

This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
990962
Report Number(s):
SAND2010-6498
TRN: US201021%%9
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; WATER; VISCOSITY; ELASTICITY; CONFINEMENT; Nucleation.; Viscoelastic materials-Mechanical properties.

Citation Formats

Houston, Jack E., Grest, Gary Stephen, Moore, Nathan W., and Feibelman, Peter J.. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/990962.
Houston, Jack E., Grest, Gary Stephen, Moore, Nathan W., & Feibelman, Peter J.. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.. United States. doi:10.2172/990962.
Houston, Jack E., Grest, Gary Stephen, Moore, Nathan W., and Feibelman, Peter J.. 2010. "Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.". United States. doi:10.2172/990962. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/990962.
@article{osti_990962,
title = {Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.},
author = {Houston, Jack E. and Grest, Gary Stephen and Moore, Nathan W. and Feibelman, Peter J.},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.},
doi = {10.2172/990962},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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