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Title: Direct Use of Solar Energy for Lighting-Results of the Hybrid Solar Lighting Field Trial Program

Abstract

Today, lighting in United States residential and commercial buildings consumes close to 5 quadrillion BTUs of primary energy and one-fifth of all electricity. In commercial buildings, one-quarter of all energy demand is for lighting. With a forecasted doubling of commercial floor space by the year 2020 comes an urgent and growing need to find more efficient ways of lighting our nation's buildings. Hybrid Solar Lighting (HSL) is a technology that can do just that by collecting sunlight and distributing it via optical fibers, into the interior of a building. A nation-wide field trial program is currently under way to provide system performance data and user-feedback essential for successful commercialization of HSL. This paper will describe several locations of the HSL system and their intended use as well as some energy savings data.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
990682
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SOLAR 2007 Conference Proceedings, Cleveland, OH, USA, 20070707, 20070712
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COMMERCIALIZATION; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY DEMAND; FLOORS; OPTICAL FIBERS; PERFORMANCE; SOLAR ENERGY; LIGHTING SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Lapsa, Melissa Voss, Beshears, David L, Maxey, L Curt, and Ward, Christina D. Direct Use of Solar Energy for Lighting-Results of the Hybrid Solar Lighting Field Trial Program. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lapsa, Melissa Voss, Beshears, David L, Maxey, L Curt, & Ward, Christina D. Direct Use of Solar Energy for Lighting-Results of the Hybrid Solar Lighting Field Trial Program. United States.
Lapsa, Melissa Voss, Beshears, David L, Maxey, L Curt, and Ward, Christina D. Mon . "Direct Use of Solar Energy for Lighting-Results of the Hybrid Solar Lighting Field Trial Program". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_990682,
title = {Direct Use of Solar Energy for Lighting-Results of the Hybrid Solar Lighting Field Trial Program},
author = {Lapsa, Melissa Voss and Beshears, David L and Maxey, L Curt and Ward, Christina D},
abstractNote = {Today, lighting in United States residential and commercial buildings consumes close to 5 quadrillion BTUs of primary energy and one-fifth of all electricity. In commercial buildings, one-quarter of all energy demand is for lighting. With a forecasted doubling of commercial floor space by the year 2020 comes an urgent and growing need to find more efficient ways of lighting our nation's buildings. Hybrid Solar Lighting (HSL) is a technology that can do just that by collecting sunlight and distributing it via optical fibers, into the interior of a building. A nation-wide field trial program is currently under way to provide system performance data and user-feedback essential for successful commercialization of HSL. This paper will describe several locations of the HSL system and their intended use as well as some energy savings data.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • We report on the design of two hybrid lighting luminaires that blend light from a fiber optic end-emitted solar source with electric T8 fluorescent lamps. Both designs involve the retrofit of a commercially-available recessed fluorescent luminaire with minimal reductions in the original luminaire's optical efficiency. Two methods for high-angle dispersion of fiber optic end-emitted solar light are described and the resulting spatial intensity distributions, simulated using ZEMAX, are compared with standard cylindrical fluorescent tubes. Differences in spatial intensity distribution are qualitatively characterized and potential design improvements discussed.
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  • ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dishmore » and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.« less
  • The goal of this project is to create widespread production and sales of energy conserving passive solar heated and cooled manufactured homes. All completed buildings will be built in a factory utilizing wood construction and integrating applied and accepted on-site construction techniques. The Usry design team has evaluated many processes of construction and has determined that environmentally controlled manufactured systems are much more cost efficient as well as quality coordinated. Utilizing certain preliminary market assessments in the Richmond metropolitan area, it was determined that a typical home consisting of 1000 to 1600 square feet would be most favorable.
  • No abstract prepared.