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Title: Foliar retention of 15N tracers: implications for net canopy exchange in low- and high-elevation forest ecosystems

Abstract

Nitrogen-15 ({sup 15}N) labelled ammonium and nitrate were applied to understory saplings in a low-elevation deciduous forest and a high-elevation coniferous forest during the 1993 growing season to estimate the minimum retention of inorganic N from wet deposition. Tissue samples were collected at both sites before and after the tracer applications to determine the initial and the final {sup 15}N content. The fraction of the tracer application retained by deciduous leaves or by current-year leaves and stems on conifers was calculated from measurements of {sup 15}N and total N content. At both study sites, tracer applications significantly increased the {sup 15}N content of sapling tissues, although there was no significant difference between the fractional retention of ammonium and nitrate. The results support earlier studies indicating that the foliar retention of {sup 15}N applied in simulated wet deposition is small. Our estimates of annual N uptake from wet deposition by the forest canopy at the low- and high-elevation study sites were only 14 and 7%, respectively. This study, along with prior studies of the different chemical forms of N deposition, indicates that canopy uptake of dry N deposition is a major contributor to the net canopy exchange of N in bothmore » forests.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park
OSTI Identifier:
989689
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Forest Ecology and Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: 2-3; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-1127
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CONIFERS; DEPOSITION; ECOSYSTEMS; FORESTS; NITRATES; NITROGEN 15; RETENTION; SEASONS; WASHOUT

Citation Formats

Garten, Jr, Charles T, Schwab, Alison, and Shirshac, Terri. Foliar retention of 15N tracers: implications for net canopy exchange in low- and high-elevation forest ecosystems. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00185-0.
Garten, Jr, Charles T, Schwab, Alison, & Shirshac, Terri. Foliar retention of 15N tracers: implications for net canopy exchange in low- and high-elevation forest ecosystems. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00185-0
Garten, Jr, Charles T, Schwab, Alison, and Shirshac, Terri. Wed . "Foliar retention of 15N tracers: implications for net canopy exchange in low- and high-elevation forest ecosystems". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00185-0.
@article{osti_989689,
title = {Foliar retention of 15N tracers: implications for net canopy exchange in low- and high-elevation forest ecosystems},
author = {Garten, Jr, Charles T and Schwab, Alison and Shirshac, Terri},
abstractNote = {Nitrogen-15 ({sup 15}N) labelled ammonium and nitrate were applied to understory saplings in a low-elevation deciduous forest and a high-elevation coniferous forest during the 1993 growing season to estimate the minimum retention of inorganic N from wet deposition. Tissue samples were collected at both sites before and after the tracer applications to determine the initial and the final {sup 15}N content. The fraction of the tracer application retained by deciduous leaves or by current-year leaves and stems on conifers was calculated from measurements of {sup 15}N and total N content. At both study sites, tracer applications significantly increased the {sup 15}N content of sapling tissues, although there was no significant difference between the fractional retention of ammonium and nitrate. The results support earlier studies indicating that the foliar retention of {sup 15}N applied in simulated wet deposition is small. Our estimates of annual N uptake from wet deposition by the forest canopy at the low- and high-elevation study sites were only 14 and 7%, respectively. This study, along with prior studies of the different chemical forms of N deposition, indicates that canopy uptake of dry N deposition is a major contributor to the net canopy exchange of N in both forests.},
doi = {10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00185-0},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/989689}, journal = {Forest Ecology and Management},
issn = {0378-1127},
number = 2-3,
volume = 103,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {4}
}