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Title: Influence of nanobubbles on the bending of microcantilevers

Abstract

Young's equation, which is commonly used for determining the contact angle of liquid drops on a solid surface, ignores the vertical component of the surface energy. Although this force is extremely small and its effect on the solid can be ignored, it plays a significant role for flexible surfaces such as microcantilevers. A gold-coated silicon microcantilever and a dodecanethiol coated silicon microcantilever were used to detect real-time formation of nanobubbles on their surfaces when exposed to air-rich water. As air nanobubbles form on the surfaces of the cantilever, the cantilever undergoes bending, and we relate this to the vertical component of surface energy in Young's equation. This implies that the vertical component of the surface tension should be considered for flexible solid surfaces, and the formation of nanobubbles should be avoided when cantilevers are used as sensors to avoid artifacts.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
989531
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AIR; BENDING; SILICON; SURFACE ENERGY; SURFACE TENSION; WATER; FORCE MICROSCOPE CANTILEVERS; HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES; ATTRACTION; BUBBLES; STRESS; GOLD

Citation Formats

Jeon, Sangmin, Desikan, Ramya, and Thundat, Thomas George. Influence of nanobubbles on the bending of microcantilevers. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2186113.
Jeon, Sangmin, Desikan, Ramya, & Thundat, Thomas George. Influence of nanobubbles on the bending of microcantilevers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186113.
Jeon, Sangmin, Desikan, Ramya, and Thundat, Thomas George. Wed . "Influence of nanobubbles on the bending of microcantilevers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186113.
@article{osti_989531,
title = {Influence of nanobubbles on the bending of microcantilevers},
author = {Jeon, Sangmin and Desikan, Ramya and Thundat, Thomas George},
abstractNote = {Young's equation, which is commonly used for determining the contact angle of liquid drops on a solid surface, ignores the vertical component of the surface energy. Although this force is extremely small and its effect on the solid can be ignored, it plays a significant role for flexible surfaces such as microcantilevers. A gold-coated silicon microcantilever and a dodecanethiol coated silicon microcantilever were used to detect real-time formation of nanobubbles on their surfaces when exposed to air-rich water. As air nanobubbles form on the surfaces of the cantilever, the cantilever undergoes bending, and we relate this to the vertical component of surface energy in Young's equation. This implies that the vertical component of the surface tension should be considered for flexible solid surfaces, and the formation of nanobubbles should be avoided when cantilevers are used as sensors to avoid artifacts.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2186113},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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