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Title: Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals

Abstract

Equal channel angular forging (ECAF) has been proposed as a severe plastic deformation technique for processing metals, alloys, and composites [e.g. Segal, 1995] (Fig. 1). The technique offers two capabilities of practical interest: a high degree of strain can be introduced with no change in the cross-sectional dimensions of the work-piece, hence, even greater strains can be introduced by re-inserting the work-piece for further deformation during subsequent passes through the ECAF die. Additionally, the deformation is accomplished by simple shear (like torsion of a short tube) on a plane whose orientation, with respect to prior deformations, can be controlled by varying the processing route. There is a nomenclature that has developed in the literature for the typical processing routes: A: no rotations; B{sub A}: 90 degrees CW (clockwise), 90 degrees CCW (counterclockwise), 9O degrees CW, 90 degrees CCW...; Bc: 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW...; and C: 180 degrees, 18 0 degrees.... The impact of processing route on the subsequent microstructure [Ferasse, Segal, Hartwig and Goforth, 1997; Iwahashi, Horita, Nemoto and Langdon, 1996] and texture [Gibbs, Hartwig, Cornwell, Goforth and Payzant, 1998] has been the subject of numerous experimental studies.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
9885
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CP-103540; KC 02 01 05 0
KC 02 01 05 0; TRN: AH200125%%188
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12th International Conference on Textures of Materials (ICOTOM12), Montreal, Quebec (CA), 08/08/1999--08/13/1999; Other Information: PBD: 8 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; DEFORMATION; DIMENSIONS; FORGING; MICROSTRUCTURE; ORIENTATION; PLASTICS; SHEAR; STRAINS; TEXTURE; TORSION

Citation Formats

Agnew, S.R. Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Agnew, S.R. Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals. United States.
Agnew, S.R. Sun . "Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9885.
@article{osti_9885,
title = {Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals},
author = {Agnew, S.R.},
abstractNote = {Equal channel angular forging (ECAF) has been proposed as a severe plastic deformation technique for processing metals, alloys, and composites [e.g. Segal, 1995] (Fig. 1). The technique offers two capabilities of practical interest: a high degree of strain can be introduced with no change in the cross-sectional dimensions of the work-piece, hence, even greater strains can be introduced by re-inserting the work-piece for further deformation during subsequent passes through the ECAF die. Additionally, the deformation is accomplished by simple shear (like torsion of a short tube) on a plane whose orientation, with respect to prior deformations, can be controlled by varying the processing route. There is a nomenclature that has developed in the literature for the typical processing routes: A: no rotations; B{sub A}: 90 degrees CW (clockwise), 90 degrees CCW (counterclockwise), 9O degrees CW, 90 degrees CCW...; Bc: 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW...; and C: 180 degrees, 18 0 degrees.... The impact of processing route on the subsequent microstructure [Ferasse, Segal, Hartwig and Goforth, 1997; Iwahashi, Horita, Nemoto and Langdon, 1996] and texture [Gibbs, Hartwig, Cornwell, Goforth and Payzant, 1998] has been the subject of numerous experimental studies.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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