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Title: Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint

Abstract

As energy-efficiency efforts focus increasingly on existing homes, we scratch our heads about construction decisions made 30, 40, 50-years ago and ask: 'What were they thinking?' A logical follow-on question is: 'What will folks think in 2050 about the homes we're building today?' This question can lead to a lively discussion, but the current practice that we find most alarming is placing ductsin the attic. In this paper, we explore through literature and analysis the impact duct location has on cooling load, peak demand, and energy cost in hot climates. For a typical new home in these climates, we estimate that locating ducts in attics rather than inside conditioned space increases the cooling load 0.5 to 1 ton, increases cooling costs 15% and increases demand by 0.75 kW. Theaggregate demand to service duct loss in homes built in Houston, Las Vegas, and Phoenix during the period 2000 through 2009 is estimated to be 700 MW. We present options for building homes with ducts in conditioned space and demonstrate that these options compare favorably with other common approaches to achieving electricity peak demand and consumption savings in homes.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
988099
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-550-48163
TRN: US201018%%249
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 2010 ACEEE Summer Study, 15-20 August 2010, Pacific Grove, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ATTICS; CLIMATES; CONSTRUCTION; COOLING LOAD; DUCTS; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ducts; ventilation; attics; conditioned space; duct location

Citation Formats

Roberts, D, and Winkler, J. Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Roberts, D, & Winkler, J. Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint. United States.
Roberts, D, and Winkler, J. Sun . "Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/988099.
@article{osti_988099,
title = {Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint},
author = {Roberts, D and Winkler, J},
abstractNote = {As energy-efficiency efforts focus increasingly on existing homes, we scratch our heads about construction decisions made 30, 40, 50-years ago and ask: 'What were they thinking?' A logical follow-on question is: 'What will folks think in 2050 about the homes we're building today?' This question can lead to a lively discussion, but the current practice that we find most alarming is placing ductsin the attic. In this paper, we explore through literature and analysis the impact duct location has on cooling load, peak demand, and energy cost in hot climates. For a typical new home in these climates, we estimate that locating ducts in attics rather than inside conditioned space increases the cooling load 0.5 to 1 ton, increases cooling costs 15% and increases demand by 0.75 kW. Theaggregate demand to service duct loss in homes built in Houston, Las Vegas, and Phoenix during the period 2000 through 2009 is estimated to be 700 MW. We present options for building homes with ducts in conditioned space and demonstrate that these options compare favorably with other common approaches to achieving electricity peak demand and consumption savings in homes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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