skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion

Abstract

Two residual (No. 6 fuel) oils from Texas and North Dakota with very different chemical compositions and physical properties were burned at similar injection rates ({approx}28 lb/hr) in a pilot-scale (550,000 Btu/hr) combustion test facility unit using conventional dual-fluid and Kimberly-Clark (K-C) acoustic nozzles to compare flame characteristics, gaseous and fly ash emissions, and fly ash morphological and chemical characteristics. The K-C acoustic nozzle supplied a more consistent oil feed rate to the furnace relative to the conventional dual-fluid nozzle. This consistency in oil flow reduced the variability in NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} flue gas concentrations. K-C nozzle injection, however, produced a more carbon-rich residual oil fly ash (ROFA) relative to the conventional nozzle. The K-C acoustic nozzle promoted oil atomization and extended the flame higher in the furnace so that the residence time of the residual oil was greatly reduced. The lack of oil residence time in the furnace contributed to the incomplete combustion performance of the K-C acoustic nozzle. On average, the K-C acoustic nozzle reduced NO{sub x} emissions from burning the Texas and North Dakota oils by 66% and 33%, respectively. Late in the test program, it was discovered that a significantmore » increase in power to the K-C acoustic nozzle improved combustion efficiency, flame stability, and reduced the amount of unburned carbon in ROFA. The unburned carbon particles were smaller, generally about 50 {micro}m in diameter, as a result of the increase in power to the K-C nozzle. Additional optimization of the K-C nozzle at higher power in a larger furnace has the potential to further improve combustion efficiency.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
988094
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-98FT40321
Resource Type:
Other
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; ACOUSTICS; ATOMIZATION; CARBON; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; COMBUSTION; EFFICIENCY; EVALUATION; FLAMES; FLUE GAS; FLY ASH; FURNACES; NOZZLES; OPTIMIZATION; PERFORMANCE; PETROLEUM RESIDUES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STABILITY

Citation Formats

Galbreath, Kevin, Gunderson, Jay, Tibbetts, James, and Kong, Lingbu. JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Galbreath, Kevin, Gunderson, Jay, Tibbetts, James, & Kong, Lingbu. JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion. United States.
Galbreath, Kevin, Gunderson, Jay, Tibbetts, James, and Kong, Lingbu. Wed . "JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/988094.
@article{osti_988094,
title = {JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion},
author = {Galbreath, Kevin and Gunderson, Jay and Tibbetts, James and Kong, Lingbu},
abstractNote = {Two residual (No. 6 fuel) oils from Texas and North Dakota with very different chemical compositions and physical properties were burned at similar injection rates ({approx}28 lb/hr) in a pilot-scale (550,000 Btu/hr) combustion test facility unit using conventional dual-fluid and Kimberly-Clark (K-C) acoustic nozzles to compare flame characteristics, gaseous and fly ash emissions, and fly ash morphological and chemical characteristics. The K-C acoustic nozzle supplied a more consistent oil feed rate to the furnace relative to the conventional dual-fluid nozzle. This consistency in oil flow reduced the variability in NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} flue gas concentrations. K-C nozzle injection, however, produced a more carbon-rich residual oil fly ash (ROFA) relative to the conventional nozzle. The K-C acoustic nozzle promoted oil atomization and extended the flame higher in the furnace so that the residence time of the residual oil was greatly reduced. The lack of oil residence time in the furnace contributed to the incomplete combustion performance of the K-C acoustic nozzle. On average, the K-C acoustic nozzle reduced NO{sub x} emissions from burning the Texas and North Dakota oils by 66% and 33%, respectively. Late in the test program, it was discovered that a significant increase in power to the K-C acoustic nozzle improved combustion efficiency, flame stability, and reduced the amount of unburned carbon in ROFA. The unburned carbon particles were smaller, generally about 50 {micro}m in diameter, as a result of the increase in power to the K-C nozzle. Additional optimization of the K-C nozzle at higher power in a larger furnace has the potential to further improve combustion efficiency.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {8}
}