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Title: Before the Big Bang? A Novel Resolution of a Profound Cosmological Puzzle

Abstract

The second law of thermodynamics says, in effect, that things get more random as time progresses. Thus, we can deduce that the beginning of the universe - the Big Bang - must have been an extraordinarily precisely organized state. What was the nature of this state? How can such a special state have come about? In Penrose's talk, a novel explanation is suggested.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
988029
Report Number(s):
BNL-82439-2007-CP
penrose
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Brookhaven Science Associates' Distinguished Lecture Series, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States), presented on February 06, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Penrose, Roger. Before the Big Bang? A Novel Resolution of a Profound Cosmological Puzzle. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Penrose, Roger. Before the Big Bang? A Novel Resolution of a Profound Cosmological Puzzle. United States.
Penrose, Roger. Tue . "Before the Big Bang? A Novel Resolution of a Profound Cosmological Puzzle". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/988029.
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title = {Before the Big Bang? A Novel Resolution of a Profound Cosmological Puzzle},
author = {Penrose, Roger},
abstractNote = {The second law of thermodynamics says, in effect, that things get more random as time progresses. Thus, we can deduce that the beginning of the universe - the Big Bang - must have been an extraordinarily precisely organized state. What was the nature of this state? How can such a special state have come about? In Penrose's talk, a novel explanation is suggested.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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