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Title: 420th Brookhaven Lecture

Abstract

"Physics and Neuroscience: Common Ground Between Disparate Fields." The Medical Department's Paul Vaska and colleagues designed and built a fully functional brain scanner so small that it can image the brain of an awake, moving animal.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
987830
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Paul Vaska. 420th Brookhaven Lecture. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Paul Vaska. 420th Brookhaven Lecture. United States.
Paul Vaska. Wed . "420th Brookhaven Lecture". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987830.
@article{osti_987830,
title = {420th Brookhaven Lecture},
author = {Paul Vaska},
abstractNote = {"Physics and Neuroscience: Common Ground Between Disparate Fields." The Medical Department's Paul Vaska and colleagues designed and built a fully functional brain scanner so small that it can image the brain of an awake, moving animal.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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