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Title: Rube Goldberg Contest

Abstract

The Rube Goldberg Machine Contest is named after cartoonist Reuben Lucius Goldberg, the spirit of whose work inspires the contest's wacky machines.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
987703
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Argonne  National  Laboratory  Rube  Goldberg  Science 

Citation Formats

None. Rube Goldberg Contest. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
None. Rube Goldberg Contest. United States.
None. Fri . "Rube Goldberg Contest". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987703.
@article{osti_987703,
title = {Rube Goldberg Contest},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {The Rube Goldberg Machine Contest is named after cartoonist Reuben Lucius Goldberg, the spirit of whose work inspires the contest's wacky machines.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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