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Title: Art and Science

Abstract

Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast.Both artists and scientists rely on the principles of mathematics and physics, whether consciously or intuitively, to achieve their goals.And, at the same time, both science and art rely on the creative questioner to ask, "Why do we do it this way?" and "Why not try something else and see what happens?"

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
987538
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Argonne  National  Laboratory 

Citation Formats

Murray Gibson. Art and Science. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Murray Gibson. Art and Science. United States.
Murray Gibson. Fri . "Art and Science". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987538.
@article{osti_987538,
title = {Art and Science},
author = {Murray Gibson},
abstractNote = {Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast.Both artists and scientists rely on the principles of mathematics and physics, whether consciously or intuitively, to achieve their goals.And, at the same time, both science and art rely on the creative questioner to ask, "Why do we do it this way?" and "Why not try something else and see what happens?"},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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