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Title: The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time

Abstract

Over a century ago, Boltzmann and others provided a microscopic understanding for the tendency of entropy to increase. But this understanding relies ultimately on an empirical fact about cosmology: the early universe had very low entropy. Why was it like that? Cosmologist aspire to provide a dynamical explanation for the observed state of the universe, but have had very little to say about the dramatic asymmetry between early times and late times. I will argue that the search for a natural explanation for the observed breakdown of time-reversal symmetry in cosmology leads us directly to interesting conclusions about inflation, quantum gravity, and the multiverse.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
987430
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on February 11, 2009
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; TIME-REVERSAL SYMMETRY; ENTROPY; DARK ENERGY; QUANTUM GRAVITY

Citation Formats

Carroll, Sean. The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1109/AERO.2010.5447043.
Carroll, Sean. The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time. United States. doi:10.1109/AERO.2010.5447043.
Carroll, Sean. Wed . "The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time". United States. doi:10.1109/AERO.2010.5447043. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987430.
@article{osti_987430,
title = {The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time},
author = {Carroll, Sean},
abstractNote = {Over a century ago, Boltzmann and others provided a microscopic understanding for the tendency of entropy to increase. But this understanding relies ultimately on an empirical fact about cosmology: the early universe had very low entropy. Why was it like that? Cosmologist aspire to provide a dynamical explanation for the observed state of the universe, but have had very little to say about the dramatic asymmetry between early times and late times. I will argue that the search for a natural explanation for the observed breakdown of time-reversal symmetry in cosmology leads us directly to interesting conclusions about inflation, quantum gravity, and the multiverse.},
doi = {10.1109/AERO.2010.5447043},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {2}
}