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Title: Nuclear Weapons: Security or Insecurity?

Abstract

Professor Pief Panofsky leads a presentation on nuclear weaponry, nuclear policy, and the risk to benefit ratio of such. A brief overview of historical nuclear policy is discussed, as well as how policy has changed over the years. Conclusions are drawn on how technological advancements have influenced policy and the development of nuclear safeguards.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
987377
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; RISK TO BENEFIT RATIO; PROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT; NUCLEAR POLICY

Citation Formats

Professor Pief Panofsky. Nuclear Weapons: Security or Insecurity?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Professor Pief Panofsky. Nuclear Weapons: Security or Insecurity?. United States.
Professor Pief Panofsky. Mon . "Nuclear Weapons: Security or Insecurity?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987377.
@article{osti_987377,
title = {Nuclear Weapons: Security or Insecurity?},
author = {Professor Pief Panofsky},
abstractNote = {Professor Pief Panofsky leads a presentation on nuclear weaponry, nuclear policy, and the risk to benefit ratio of such. A brief overview of historical nuclear policy is discussed, as well as how policy has changed over the years. Conclusions are drawn on how technological advancements have influenced policy and the development of nuclear safeguards.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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