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Title: Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

Abstract

It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Colorado, Colorado, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
987216
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on May 16, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Finkelstein, Noah. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Finkelstein, Noah. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research. United States.
Finkelstein, Noah. Wed . "Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987216.
@article{osti_987216,
title = {Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research},
author = {Finkelstein, Noah},
abstractNote = {It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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