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Title: Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

Abstract

One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. IBM Watson Research Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
987211
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on April 11, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

DiVincenzo, David. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
DiVincenzo, David. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems. United States.
DiVincenzo, David. Thu . "Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987211.
@article{osti_987211,
title = {Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems},
author = {DiVincenzo, David},
abstractNote = {One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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