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Title: Singularities and Transitions, Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
987200
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sidney Nagel. Singularities and Transitions, Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Sidney Nagel. Singularities and Transitions, Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream. United States.
Sidney Nagel. Wed . "Singularities and Transitions, Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987200.
@article{osti_987200,
title = {Singularities and Transitions, Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream},
author = {Sidney Nagel},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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