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Title: Science and Science Fiction

Abstract

I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
987166
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on March 29, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

Scherrer, Robert. Science and Science Fiction. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Scherrer, Robert. Science and Science Fiction. United States.
Scherrer, Robert. Wed . "Science and Science Fiction". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987166.
@article{osti_987166,
title = {Science and Science Fiction},
author = {Scherrer, Robert},
abstractNote = {I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 29 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 29 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}