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Title: Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets

Abstract

There are a number of crises that a potentially habitable planet must avoid or surmount if its potential is to be realized. These include the runaway greenhouse, loss of atmosphere by chemical or physical processes, and long-lasting global glaciation. In this lecture I will present research on the climate dynamics governing such processes, with particular emphasis on the lessons to be learned from the cases of Early Mars and the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
987156
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on February 8, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Pierrehumbert, Raymond. Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Pierrehumbert, Raymond. Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets. United States.
Pierrehumbert, Raymond. Wed . "Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/987156.
@article{osti_987156,
title = {Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets},
author = {Pierrehumbert, Raymond},
abstractNote = {There are a number of crises that a potentially habitable planet must avoid or surmount if its potential is to be realized. These include the runaway greenhouse, loss of atmosphere by chemical or physical processes, and long-lasting global glaciation. In this lecture I will present research on the climate dynamics governing such processes, with particular emphasis on the lessons to be learned from the cases of Early Mars and the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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