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Title: BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO

Abstract

A Bison. (probable Bison antiguus) distal humerus fragment was found within a Pleistocene colluvial deposit on a hillslope above Canada del Buey near White Rock, New Mexico. The Bison fossil is preserved within a buried soil with an inferred age of ca. 50-100 ka, based on soil properties and on stratigraphic position below a deposit of ca. 50-60 ka EI Cajete pumice. This represents the second oldest dated Bison in New Mexico, and one of the few occurrences of this genus in the northern mountains of the state. It is also only the second record of a Pleistocene vertebrate from Los Alamos County, and is a rare occurrence of a pre-25 ka Bison fossil in good stratigraphic context. Hillslopes in the study area are underlain by a sequence of truncated Pleistocene and Holocene soils that are inferred to represent colluvial deposition and soil formation followed by erosion in the mid Pleistocene (buried soil 'b3'), the late Pleistocene (buried soil 'b2'), and the mid-to-late Holocene (buried soil 'b1'). The surface soil is developed in depOSits that overlie 600-800 year-old Ancestral Puebloan sites. Colluvium is dominated by relatively fine-grained (fine to very fine sand) slopewash colluvium deposited by overland flow, but alsomore » includes rocky colluvium on hillslopes below mesas. The fine-grained colluvium is likely derived mainly from reworking of eolian deposits. Episodic colluvial deposition appears to, at least in part, accompany and follow episodic eolian events, with intervening periods dominated by erosion and the development of truncated soils.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
986515
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-0949
TRN: US201017%%379
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: NEW MEXICO GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 2007 FIELD CONFERENCE ; 200709 ; LOS ALAMOS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; DEPOSITION; SAND; SOILS; STRATIGRAPHY; VERTEBRATES

Citation Formats

RENEAU, STEVEN L., DRAKOS, PAUL G., and MORGAN, GARY S. BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
RENEAU, STEVEN L., DRAKOS, PAUL G., & MORGAN, GARY S. BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO. United States.
RENEAU, STEVEN L., DRAKOS, PAUL G., and MORGAN, GARY S. Mon . "BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/986515.
@article{osti_986515,
title = {BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO},
author = {RENEAU, STEVEN L. and DRAKOS, PAUL G. and MORGAN, GARY S.},
abstractNote = {A Bison. (probable Bison antiguus) distal humerus fragment was found within a Pleistocene colluvial deposit on a hillslope above Canada del Buey near White Rock, New Mexico. The Bison fossil is preserved within a buried soil with an inferred age of ca. 50-100 ka, based on soil properties and on stratigraphic position below a deposit of ca. 50-60 ka EI Cajete pumice. This represents the second oldest dated Bison in New Mexico, and one of the few occurrences of this genus in the northern mountains of the state. It is also only the second record of a Pleistocene vertebrate from Los Alamos County, and is a rare occurrence of a pre-25 ka Bison fossil in good stratigraphic context. Hillslopes in the study area are underlain by a sequence of truncated Pleistocene and Holocene soils that are inferred to represent colluvial deposition and soil formation followed by erosion in the mid Pleistocene (buried soil 'b3'), the late Pleistocene (buried soil 'b2'), and the mid-to-late Holocene (buried soil 'b1'). The surface soil is developed in depOSits that overlie 600-800 year-old Ancestral Puebloan sites. Colluvium is dominated by relatively fine-grained (fine to very fine sand) slopewash colluvium deposited by overland flow, but also includes rocky colluvium on hillslopes below mesas. The fine-grained colluvium is likely derived mainly from reworking of eolian deposits. Episodic colluvial deposition appears to, at least in part, accompany and follow episodic eolian events, with intervening periods dominated by erosion and the development of truncated soils.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • Radiocarbon dates obtained from three canyons on the Pajarito Plateau, northern NM document alternating periods of Holocene stream aggradation and degradation that are, at least in part, synchronous between canyons. Four or more Holocene terraces are present in Frijoles Canyon, which has been rapidly incising into easily eroded, non-welded 1.1 Ma Bandelier Tuff. The oldest of these is an extensive fill terrace that is underlain by up to 13 m of stream gravels. This fill terrace records the most significant period of Holocene aggradation in Frijoles Canyon, and a date of 6.2 ka from basal slopewash burying the stream sedimentsmore » provides a minimum-limiting age for this terrace. After 6.2 ka, temporary pauses in channel incision are recorded by strath terraces dated at ca. 4.6 and 1.6 ka, and an intermediate undated strath terrace. Age data obtained from Rendija and Cabra Canyons, 13 km to the north, indicate periods of stream aggradation similar in age to those in Frijoles Canyon. A minimum of two Holocene terraces are present in Rendija Canyon, and dates of 6.1--6.3 ka from stream sediments beneath the higher terrace and from overlying slopewash correlate it with the major fill terrace in Frijoles Canyon. In Cabra Canyon the unchanneled valley floor is underlain by more than 7 m of unconsolidated sediments, and four or more unconformable sedimentary packages were exposed in a 4-m deep trench. The lowest exposed Holocene sediments yielded an age of ca. 5.7 ka, and three overlying units that back-fill paleo-channels yielded ages of 3.5--3.8, 1.6, and 0.3 ka. In all three canyons the modern floodplains are aggrading, and radiocarbon dates of 0--0.4 ka from the uppermost sediments of the valley floors suggest these streams have been near present level for several hundred years. The similar ages obtained from stream deposits in Pajarito Plateau drainages suggest a climatic control for at least some of the aggradation events.« less
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) contains a radioactive waste storage and disposal facility. It is located on Mesita del Buey, which extends east-southeasterly on the New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau. This mesa is one of a series of narrow mesas, hundreds of meters wide, that define the topography of the plateau. The mesas are separated by steep canyons, tens to hundreds of meters deep. Pajarito Canyon is to the south of Mesita del Buey, while Canada del Buey lies to the north. In general, the entire plateau slopes downward toward the east and the Rio Grande Valley, withmore » the highest peaks of the Jemez Mountains to the west. Meterological observations collected at various sites around the Pajarito Plateau indicate that the atmospheric conditions in the area are complex and strongly influenced by the highly-variable local topography. For this study, numerical simulations of the atmospheric circulations in the area around TA-54 are carried out to produce a more detailed depiction of the wind flow than can be provided by the Laboratory`s network of meterological observation towers. Plumes of particles released into these wind fields are simulated as an indication of transport and diffusion from a hypothetical release. 4 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • Geophysical techniques can be used for non-invasive surveys at archaeological sites. Seismic refraction is one such technology that has many potential applications, although it has been under-utilized. It is an inexpensive, efficient way to characterize subsurface deposits, especially at sites in shallow contexts over bedrock. Archaeologists and geophysicists participating in the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE), from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Bandelier National Monument are working together to characterize Ancestral Pueblo (A.D. 1200 to 1600) sites. We present the results from three seismic refraction surveys and provide an overview of how seismic refraction works.