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Title: An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

Abstract

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads withinmore » the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NA)
OSTI Identifier:
985877
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/25946-767
TRN: US1007627
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC52-06NA25946
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ALTITUDE; AMERICIUM 241; BACKGROUND RADIATION; DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEMS; DEPOSITION; ENERGY SPECTRA; FLUCTUATIONS; GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM; GROUND LEVEL; HELICOPTERS; NEVADA TEST SITE; ORIENTATION; QUALITY CONTROL; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; REMOTE SENSING; SODIUM IODIDES; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; URANIUM 235; aerial radiological survey, Area 18, Nevada Test Site

Citation Formats

Craig Lyons. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/985877.
Craig Lyons. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site. United States. doi:10.2172/985877.
Craig Lyons. Fri . "An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site". United States. doi:10.2172/985877. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/985877.
@article{osti_985877,
title = {An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site},
author = {Craig Lyons},
abstractNote = {As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).},
doi = {10.2172/985877},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 31 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Fri Jul 31 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}

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