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Title: Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet

Abstract

This Methodology Booklet provides a comprehensive review and methodology guiding principles for constructing energy efficiency indicators, with illustrative examples of application to individual countries. It reviews work done by international agencies and national government in constructing meaningful energy efficiency indicators that help policy makers to assess changes in energy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices, and the knowledge of these countries' institutions, relevant sources of information to construct an energy indicator database are identified. A framework based on levels of hierarchy of indicators -- spanning from aggregate, macro level to disaggregated end-use level metrics -- is presented to help shape the understanding of assessing energy efficiency. In each sector of activity: industry, commercial, residential, agriculture and transport, indicators are presented and recommendations to distinguish the different factors affecting energy use are highlighted. The methodology booklet addresses specifically issues that are relevant to developing indicators where activity is a major factor driving energy demand. A companion spreadsheet tool is available upon request.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Environmental Energy Technologies Division
OSTI Identifier:
985845
Report Number(s):
LBNL-3702E
TRN: US201017%%239
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29; AGRICULTURE; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; METRICS; NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; OECD; RECOMMENDATIONS; SHAPE; TRANSPORT; energy efficiency, indicators, industry, residential, services, transport, agriculture

Citation Formats

Sathaye, Jayant, Price, Lynn, McNeil, Michael, and de la rue du Can, Stephane. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/985845.
Sathaye, Jayant, Price, Lynn, McNeil, Michael, & de la rue du Can, Stephane. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet. United States. doi:10.2172/985845.
Sathaye, Jayant, Price, Lynn, McNeil, Michael, and de la rue du Can, Stephane. Sat . "Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet". United States. doi:10.2172/985845. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/985845.
@article{osti_985845,
title = {Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet},
author = {Sathaye, Jayant and Price, Lynn and McNeil, Michael and de la rue du Can, Stephane},
abstractNote = {This Methodology Booklet provides a comprehensive review and methodology guiding principles for constructing energy efficiency indicators, with illustrative examples of application to individual countries. It reviews work done by international agencies and national government in constructing meaningful energy efficiency indicators that help policy makers to assess changes in energy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices, and the knowledge of these countries' institutions, relevant sources of information to construct an energy indicator database are identified. A framework based on levels of hierarchy of indicators -- spanning from aggregate, macro level to disaggregated end-use level metrics -- is presented to help shape the understanding of assessing energy efficiency. In each sector of activity: industry, commercial, residential, agriculture and transport, indicators are presented and recommendations to distinguish the different factors affecting energy use are highlighted. The methodology booklet addresses specifically issues that are relevant to developing indicators where activity is a major factor driving energy demand. A companion spreadsheet tool is available upon request.},
doi = {10.2172/985845},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This summary report presents information on the end-uses of energy in the residential sector of seven major OECD countries over the period 1960-1978. Much of the information contained herein has never been published before. We present data on energy consumption by energy type and end-use for three to five different years for each country. Each year table is complemented by a set of indicators, which are assembled for the entire 20-year period at the end of each country listing. Finally, a set of key indicators from each country is displayed together in a table, allowing comparison for three periods: earlymore » (1960-63), pre-embargo (1970-73), and recent (1975-78). Analysis of these results, smoothing and interpolation of the data, addition of further data, and analytical comparison of in-country and cross-country trends will follow in the next phase of our work.« less
  • This summary report presents information on the end-uses of energy in the residential sector of seven major OECD countries over the period 1960-1978. Data are presented on energy consumption by energy type and end-use for three to five different years for each country. Each year table is complemented by a set of indicators, which are assembled for the entire 20-year period at the end of each country listing. Finally, a set of key indicators from each country is displayed together in a table, allowing comparison for three periods: early (1960-63), pre-embargo (1970-73), and recent (1975-78). Analysis of these results, smoothingmore » and interpolation of the data, addition of further data, and analytical comparison of in-country, and cross-country trends will follow in the next phase of the work.« less
  • The United States has long been accused of being energy inefficient based on a comparison of energy intensities among the industrialized countries. Energy intensity is commonly measured by computing the ratio of energy use per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). This is not a true measure of efficiency, however, because it does not account for differences in the standard of living, differences in population densities, or other factors. After corrections are made to account for these factors, the United States often appears to be as efficient or more efficient than many of the other industrialized countries. In this analysismore » the industrialized economies considered are the Group of Seven (G7): the United States, Canada, Japan, France, Italy, West Germany, and the United Kingdom. In summary, since 1970 the United States has improved the efficiency of energy use as much or more than have the other G-7 countries. Frequently, the United States is more efficient in its use of energy than are other G-7 countries. Many of the differences in energy use result from the fact that the United States has the comparative advantage of abundant indigenous energy supplies which have been used to develop large energy intensive but not necessarily inefficient petrochemical, and primary metals industries. The United States continues to hold this advantage, producing 50 percent more energy in 1988 than did all the remaining G-7 countries combined. 12 figs.« less