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Title: INCREASED PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR 21ST CENTURY NUCLEAR POWER

Abstract

World energy demand and greenhouse gases are expected to significantly increase in the near future. Key developing countries have identified nuclear power as a major contributor to their future energy sources. Consequently, the US and others are currently exploring the concept of a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to address the concerns of nuclear proliferation. This effort is also being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). While the IAEA currently provides the framework for monitoring of state sponsored nuclear proliferation by way of international treaties, a complimentary action is to promote more proliferation resistant fuel cycles and advanced safeguards technology. As such, it is the responsibility of current technology owners to increase their nuclear fuel cycle proliferation resistance. For those countries that have an active and well-developed fuel cycle, it will require future enhancements. For those countries with extensive nuclear energy experience, yet less active programs, it requires re-engagement for technology development and deployment. The following paper discusses potential fuel cycle and technology changes that affect proliferation resistance; and consequently, may form the basis of future technology development efforts.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
984529
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-0461
TRN: US1005957
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ROME 07, 20TH WORLD ENERGY CONFERENCE ; 200711 ; ROME
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY SOURCES; FUEL CYCLE; GREENHOUSE GASES; IAEA; MONITORING; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR POWER; PROLIFERATION; SAFEGUARDS; TREATIES

Citation Formats

DEMUTH, SCOTT F., THOMAS, KEN E., and WALLACE, RICHARD K. INCREASED PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR 21ST CENTURY NUCLEAR POWER. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
DEMUTH, SCOTT F., THOMAS, KEN E., & WALLACE, RICHARD K. INCREASED PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR 21ST CENTURY NUCLEAR POWER. United States.
DEMUTH, SCOTT F., THOMAS, KEN E., and WALLACE, RICHARD K. Mon . "INCREASED PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR 21ST CENTURY NUCLEAR POWER". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/984529.
@article{osti_984529,
title = {INCREASED PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR 21ST CENTURY NUCLEAR POWER},
author = {DEMUTH, SCOTT F. and THOMAS, KEN E. and WALLACE, RICHARD K.},
abstractNote = {World energy demand and greenhouse gases are expected to significantly increase in the near future. Key developing countries have identified nuclear power as a major contributor to their future energy sources. Consequently, the US and others are currently exploring the concept of a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to address the concerns of nuclear proliferation. This effort is also being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). While the IAEA currently provides the framework for monitoring of state sponsored nuclear proliferation by way of international treaties, a complimentary action is to promote more proliferation resistant fuel cycles and advanced safeguards technology. As such, it is the responsibility of current technology owners to increase their nuclear fuel cycle proliferation resistance. For those countries that have an active and well-developed fuel cycle, it will require future enhancements. For those countries with extensive nuclear energy experience, yet less active programs, it requires re-engagement for technology development and deployment. The following paper discusses potential fuel cycle and technology changes that affect proliferation resistance; and consequently, may form the basis of future technology development efforts.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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