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Title: Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

Abstract

Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondarymore » organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Environmental Energy Technologies Division
OSTI Identifier:
983487
Report Number(s):
LBNL-3509E
TRN: US1004470
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; AEROSOLS; AGING; CARBON; CARBON SOURCES; CLIMATE MODELS; CLIMATES; CLOUDS; COATINGS; DISTRIBUTION; GASES; MITIGATION; NITRATES; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; PARTICLE PROPERTIES; SULFATES

Citation Formats

Bauer, Susanne E., Menon, Surabi, Koch, Dorothy, Bond, Tami, and Tsigaridis, Kostas. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Bauer, Susanne E., Menon, Surabi, Koch, Dorothy, Bond, Tami, & Tsigaridis, Kostas. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model. United States.
Bauer, Susanne E., Menon, Surabi, Koch, Dorothy, Bond, Tami, and Tsigaridis, Kostas. Fri . "Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/983487.
@article{osti_983487,
title = {Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model},
author = {Bauer, Susanne E. and Menon, Surabi and Koch, Dorothy and Bond, Tami and Tsigaridis, Kostas},
abstractNote = {Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.},
doi = {},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Fri Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}