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Title: CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

Abstract

Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); MacArthur Foundation and University of Chicago Energy Initiative
OSTI Identifier:
982343
Report Number(s):
ANL/MCS-TM-307
TRN: US201014%%259
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; CARBON; CLIMATES; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ECONOMICS; GASOLINE; MITIGATION; TAXES; TRAJECTORIES

Citation Formats

Elliott, J., Foster, I., Judd, K., Moyer, E., Munson, T., Univ. of Chicago, and Hoover Inst. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/982343.
Elliott, J., Foster, I., Judd, K., Moyer, E., Munson, T., Univ. of Chicago, & Hoover Inst. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.. United States. doi:10.2172/982343.
Elliott, J., Foster, I., Judd, K., Moyer, E., Munson, T., Univ. of Chicago, and Hoover Inst. Fri . "CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.". United States. doi:10.2172/982343. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/982343.
@article{osti_982343,
title = {CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.},
author = {Elliott, J. and Foster, I. and Judd, K. and Moyer, E. and Munson, T. and Univ. of Chicago and Hoover Inst.},
abstractNote = {Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.},
doi = {10.2172/982343},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Primary marine aerosol (PMA) is emitted into the atmosphere via breaking wind waves on the ocean surface. Most parameterizations of PMA emissions use 10-meter wind speed as a proxy for wave action. This investigation coupled the 3 rd generation prognostic WAVEWATCH-III wind-wave model within a coupled Earth system model (ESM) to drive PMA production using wave energy dissipation rate – analogous to whitecapping – in place of 10-meter wind speed. The wind speed parameterization did not capture basin-scale variability in relations between wind and wave fields. Overall, the wave parameterization did not improve comparison between simulated versus measured AOD ormore » Na +, thus highlighting large remaining uncertainties in model physics. Results confirm the efficacy of prognostic wind-wave models for air-sea exchange studies coupled with laboratory- and field-based characterizations of the primary physical drivers of PMA production. No discernible correlations were evident between simulated PMA fields and observed chlorophyll or sea surface temperature.« less
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