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Title: Design and performance of a compact collimator on GM/CA-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source.

Abstract

A new macromolecular crystallographic facility developed by The General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a part of the Biosciences Division (BIO), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility consists of three beamlines: two lines based on the first 'hard' dual canted undulators and one bending magnet beamline. Several compact collimator systems have been developed for the purpose of background reduction in macromolecular crystallography experiments. The apparatus consists of a tube collimator, pinhole and kinematics mount. This paper will present a series of compact collimator designs and crystallographic applications based on experimental requirements. We also describe the magnet-based kinematic mounting structures developed as a collimator holder.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
982338
Report Number(s):
ANL/BIO/CP-60032
TRN: US201013%%1016
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPIE Optics and Photonics 2007; Aug. 26, 2007 - Aug. 30, 2007; San Diego, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; ANL; BENDING; COLLIMATORS; COMPACTS; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DESIGN; EQUIPMENT; MAGNETS; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; OPTICS; PERFORMANCE; REDUCTION; TUBES; USES; WIGGLER MAGNETS

Citation Formats

Xu, S., Fischetti, R. F., and Biosciences Division. Design and performance of a compact collimator on GM/CA-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1117/12.733173.
Xu, S., Fischetti, R. F., & Biosciences Division. Design and performance of a compact collimator on GM/CA-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source.. United States. doi:10.1117/12.733173.
Xu, S., Fischetti, R. F., and Biosciences Division. Mon . "Design and performance of a compact collimator on GM/CA-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source.". United States. doi:10.1117/12.733173.
@article{osti_982338,
title = {Design and performance of a compact collimator on GM/CA-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source.},
author = {Xu, S. and Fischetti, R. F. and Biosciences Division},
abstractNote = {A new macromolecular crystallographic facility developed by The General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a part of the Biosciences Division (BIO), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility consists of three beamlines: two lines based on the first 'hard' dual canted undulators and one bending magnet beamline. Several compact collimator systems have been developed for the purpose of background reduction in macromolecular crystallography experiments. The apparatus consists of a tube collimator, pinhole and kinematics mount. This paper will present a series of compact collimator designs and crystallographic applications based on experimental requirements. We also describe the magnet-based kinematic mounting structures developed as a collimator holder.},
doi = {10.1117/12.733173},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Use of a mirror for beamlines at third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National laboratory, has many advantages. A mirror as a first optical component provides significant reduction in the beam peak heat flux and total power on the downstream monochromator and simplifies the bremsstrahlung shielding design for the beamline transport. It also allows one to have a system for multibeamline branching and switching. More generally, a mirror is used for beam focusing and/or low-pass filtering. Six different mirror mounts have been designed for the SRI-CAT beamlines. Four of them are designed asmore » water-cooled mirrors for white or pink beam use, and the other two are for monochromatic beam use. Mirror mount designs, including vacuum vessel structure and precision supporting stages, are presented in this paper.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Pharmaceutical research depends on macromolecular crystallography as a tool in drug design and development. To solve the de novo three-dimensional atomic structure of a protein, it is essential to know the phases of the X-rays scattered by a protein crystal. Experimental phases can be obtained from multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) experiments. Dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, the IMCA-CAT bending magnet beamline at sector 17 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) was upgraded to provide the energy resolution required to successfully perform synchrotron radiation-based MAD phasing of protein crystal structures. A collimating mirror was inserted into the beam path upstream of amore » double-crystal monochromator, thus increasing the monochromatic beam throughput in a particular bandwidth without sacrificing the energy resolution of the system. The beam is focused horizontally by a sagittally bent crystal and vertically by a cylindrically bent mirror, delivering a beam at the sample of 130 {micro}m (vertically) x 250 {micro}m (horizontally) FWHM. As a result of the upgrade, the beamline now operates with an energy range of 7.5 x 17.5 keV, delivers 8 x 10{sup +11} photons/sec at 12.398 keV at the sample, and has an energy resolution of {delta}E/E = 1.45 x 10{sup -4} at 10 keV, which is suitable for MAD experiments.« less
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