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Title: Elucidating Biogeochemical Reduction of Chromate via Carbon Amendments and Soil Sterilization

Abstract

Sterilized and non-sterilized soil columns were amended with three different carbon sources to elucidate the potential for geochemical and biological Cr{sup 6+} reduction. Cr{sup 6+} was reduced to Cr{sup 3+} in the non-sterilized lactate, ethanol, and acetate-amended soils; however, soils amended with lactate reduced significantly more chromium. Soils sterilized by {gamma}-irradiation reduced almost no Cr{sup 6+}, indicating that Cr{sup 6+} reduction was at least indirectly biological in nature. Analyses of small subunit (ssu) rRNA genes amplified from the column sediments showed significantly different bacterial populations within the amended soils that may be due to carbon source or to aerobic micropockets within the sediment columns.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. Stanford University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
982113
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geomicrobiology Journal; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; CARBON; CARBON SOURCES; CHROMATES; CHROMIUM; ETHANOL; GENES; LACTATES; SEDIMENTS; SOILS; STERILIZATION

Citation Formats

Bank, Tracy L, Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A., Fendorf, Scott, Baldwin, Mark E, and Jardine, Philip M. Elucidating Biogeochemical Reduction of Chromate via Carbon Amendments and Soil Sterilization. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/01490450701266639.
Bank, Tracy L, Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A., Fendorf, Scott, Baldwin, Mark E, & Jardine, Philip M. Elucidating Biogeochemical Reduction of Chromate via Carbon Amendments and Soil Sterilization. United States. doi:10.1080/01490450701266639.
Bank, Tracy L, Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A., Fendorf, Scott, Baldwin, Mark E, and Jardine, Philip M. Thu . "Elucidating Biogeochemical Reduction of Chromate via Carbon Amendments and Soil Sterilization". United States. doi:10.1080/01490450701266639.
@article{osti_982113,
title = {Elucidating Biogeochemical Reduction of Chromate via Carbon Amendments and Soil Sterilization},
author = {Bank, Tracy L and Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A and Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. and Fendorf, Scott and Baldwin, Mark E and Jardine, Philip M},
abstractNote = {Sterilized and non-sterilized soil columns were amended with three different carbon sources to elucidate the potential for geochemical and biological Cr{sup 6+} reduction. Cr{sup 6+} was reduced to Cr{sup 3+} in the non-sterilized lactate, ethanol, and acetate-amended soils; however, soils amended with lactate reduced significantly more chromium. Soils sterilized by {gamma}-irradiation reduced almost no Cr{sup 6+}, indicating that Cr{sup 6+} reduction was at least indirectly biological in nature. Analyses of small subunit (ssu) rRNA genes amplified from the column sediments showed significantly different bacterial populations within the amended soils that may be due to carbon source or to aerobic micropockets within the sediment columns.},
doi = {10.1080/01490450701266639},
journal = {Geomicrobiology Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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