skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection

Abstract

The feasibility of using Electric field enhanced oxidation (EFEO) to fabricate metal-oxide nanowires for sensing toxic gases was investigated. The effects of fabrication parameters such as film thickness, ambient relative humidity, atomic force microscope (AFM) tip bias voltage, force, scan speed and number of scans on the growth of nanowires were determined. The chemical composition of indium-oxide nanowires was verified using Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that oxygen to indium ration was 1.69, 1.72, 1.71 and 1.84 at depths of 0, 1.3, 2.5, and 3.8 nm, which was near the 1.5:1 expected for stoichiometric indium-oxide film. Future work will include characterizing the electrical and gas sensing properties of the metal-oxide nanowires.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
982010
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-52754
9796; KP1704020; TRN: US201012%%1445
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Nanotech 2005, 2:519-522
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; DETECTION; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; FABRICATION; FILMS; GASES; GROWTH; HUMIDITY; INDIUM; MICROSCOPES; OXIDATION; OXYGEN; THICKNESS; VELOCITY; WORK; Electric field enhanced oxidation; nanosensors; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Devineni, D. P., Stormo, S., Kempf, W., Schenkel, J., Behanan, R., Lea, Alan S., and Galipeau, David W.. Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Devineni, D. P., Stormo, S., Kempf, W., Schenkel, J., Behanan, R., Lea, Alan S., & Galipeau, David W.. Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection. United States.
Devineni, D. P., Stormo, S., Kempf, W., Schenkel, J., Behanan, R., Lea, Alan S., and Galipeau, David W.. Tue . "Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_982010,
title = {Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection},
author = {Devineni, D. P. and Stormo, S. and Kempf, W. and Schenkel, J. and Behanan, R. and Lea, Alan S. and Galipeau, David W.},
abstractNote = {The feasibility of using Electric field enhanced oxidation (EFEO) to fabricate metal-oxide nanowires for sensing toxic gases was investigated. The effects of fabrication parameters such as film thickness, ambient relative humidity, atomic force microscope (AFM) tip bias voltage, force, scan speed and number of scans on the growth of nanowires were determined. The chemical composition of indium-oxide nanowires was verified using Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that oxygen to indium ration was 1.69, 1.72, 1.71 and 1.84 at depths of 0, 1.3, 2.5, and 3.8 nm, which was near the 1.5:1 expected for stoichiometric indium-oxide film. Future work will include characterizing the electrical and gas sensing properties of the metal-oxide nanowires.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Abstract not provided.
  • LIBS spectra were recorded in various spectral regions during a test on the Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system at Western Energy Technology Office (WETO), Mountain State Energy (MSE), Butte, Montana. The elements C, Cr, Fe, Na, Ni, Ca and K were identified in the recorded LIBS spectra. The concentration of Cr and Na were monitored in three different segments of the test by monitoring the emission intensities of the elements.
  • The objective of this research was to discover the chemical effects and effectiveness of the condensing process in removal of particulate and vapor phase emissions that pass through electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters.
  • The principal goal of this paper is to present an integrated process for flue gas cleaning and to explain the nature of the chemical reactions that take place when the temperature of the flue gas is lowered to near or below ambient temperature. A second goal of this paper is to discover the chemical effects and effectiveness of the condensing process in removal of the particulate and vapor phase emissions that pass through the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or fabric filter emission controls. A third goal of this paper is to present the impact on the flue gas energy recovery andmore » its effect on the power plant efficiency when using a condensing heat exchanger for boiler flue gas cleaning.« less
  • Almost all known pure thermochemical hydrogen production cycles can be grouped into five generic classes, each involving either a metal oxide or a metal halide as an intermediate. In general, those cycles with the highest-temperature endothermic reactions and the least number of reactions are the most efficient. This is expected because thermochemical cycles are special types of heat engines. The ''maximum attainable'' efficiency of known published cycles is about 65 percent with 1225/sup 0/C input heat and assuming present technology for conversion of heat to work. The most difficult step in any thermochemical cycle is usually the one involving amore » change in metal oxidation state, usually the reduction. It is often necessary to operate such a step with some work input, such as electrolysis. Because of this, few of the truly efficient and workable hydrogen production cycles are purely thermochemical. Of these thermochemical hydrogen production cycles that are known to be workable with reagent-grade materials, more than two-thirds are of the group constructed from compounds of iron, chlorine, hydrogen, and oxygen. The ''maximum attainable'' efficiency for cycles of this group is about 47 percent with 925/sup 0/C input heat and present technology for conversion of heat to work. This efficiency drops to about 43 percent if the reaction steps are assumed to operate attemperatures based on thermodynamics.« less