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Title: Plasmon Excitations in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Simultaneous Imaging of Modes with Different Localizations Coupled at the Tip

Abstract

The authors investigate the localization of photons emitted at the tip during scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on atomically flat gold substrates. Emission patterns of the plasmon-mediated luminescence exhibit distinct features that are assigned to the localized modes of the surface plasmon (LSP) confined to the tunneling gap and propagating modes (PSP) coupled to the LSP by the optical cavity beneath the tip. Tunneling luminescence spectroscopy reveals that the plasmon localization at the tip increases when modes of higher energy are excited. Acquisition of local emission patterns allows us for the simultaneous imaging of LSP and PSP modes.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
981984
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 19, 2007; Related Information: Article No. 193109
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; EMISSION; ENERGY; EXHIBITS; GOLD; LUMINESCENCE; PHOTONS; PLASMONS; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SPECTROSCOPY; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES; TUNNELING; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Romero, M. J., van de Lagemaat, J., Rumbles, G., and Al-Jassim, M. M. Plasmon Excitations in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Simultaneous Imaging of Modes with Different Localizations Coupled at the Tip. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2737400.
Romero, M. J., van de Lagemaat, J., Rumbles, G., & Al-Jassim, M. M. Plasmon Excitations in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Simultaneous Imaging of Modes with Different Localizations Coupled at the Tip. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737400.
Romero, M. J., van de Lagemaat, J., Rumbles, G., and Al-Jassim, M. M. Mon . "Plasmon Excitations in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Simultaneous Imaging of Modes with Different Localizations Coupled at the Tip". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737400.
@article{osti_981984,
title = {Plasmon Excitations in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Simultaneous Imaging of Modes with Different Localizations Coupled at the Tip},
author = {Romero, M. J. and van de Lagemaat, J. and Rumbles, G. and Al-Jassim, M. M.},
abstractNote = {The authors investigate the localization of photons emitted at the tip during scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on atomically flat gold substrates. Emission patterns of the plasmon-mediated luminescence exhibit distinct features that are assigned to the localized modes of the surface plasmon (LSP) confined to the tunneling gap and propagating modes (PSP) coupled to the LSP by the optical cavity beneath the tip. Tunneling luminescence spectroscopy reveals that the plasmon localization at the tip increases when modes of higher energy are excited. Acquisition of local emission patterns allows us for the simultaneous imaging of LSP and PSP modes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2737400},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 19, 2007,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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