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Title: Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings

Abstract

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
981978
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Energy Sustainability 2007 [CD-ROM]: Proceedings of the 2007 ASME Energy Sustainability Conference (ES2007), 27-30 June 2007, Long Beach, California; Related Information: Paper No. ES2007-36105
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BUILDINGS; COMBUSTION; ELECTRICITY; EMISSION; ENERGY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FUELS; GRIDS; HEAT; PLANTS; POWER; PRODUCTION; STANDARDS; Buildings

Citation Formats

Deru, M. Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Deru, M. Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings. United States.
Deru, M. Mon . "Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_981978,
title = {Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings},
author = {Deru, M.},
abstractNote = {This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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